Mary Spiro has been ASCB's Science Writer and Social Media Manager since January 2017. She's the former science writer for Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and writer/editor for University of Maryland Baltimore, LifeBridge Health and The Manhattan (KS) Mercury newspaper. She holds an MS in Biotechnology from Johns Hopkins University and bachelor's degrees in journalism and agronomy from the University of Maryland, College Park.


ASCB awards seven ‘Science Sandbox’ public engagement grants

The American Society for Cell Biology’s (ASCB) new Public Engagement Grants, supported by Science Sandbox, an initiative of the Simons Foundation, has selected seven finalists for the 2018 awards cycle. The grantees will receive from $10,000 to $35,000 to realize their bold ideas, with the  … Read more

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HHMI chooses four ASCB members to join 2018 investigator cadre

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) today announced that it will invest $200 million in a new cadre of 19 investigators, a group of individuals known for pushing the boundaries of biomedical research. The four long-time ASCB members in the new group of investigators announced  … Read more

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Joint NCI-ASCB conference reveals advanced cancer cell imaging methods

The number and types of advanced imaging techniques and technologies available to cell biologists today have grown exponentially over the last few years. As classical microscopy methods are refined and new imaging tools come online to visualize the cellular and subcellular world, it can be  … Read more

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Nine ASCB members elected to National Academy of Sciences

The American Society for Cell Biology congratulates nine ASCB members recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) on May 1, 2018. NAS added 84 new members and 21 foreign associates to its ranks in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original  … Read more

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New organoid moves us closer to better understanding of the human brain

Scientists seek to create model systems that accurately recapitulate conditions in living organisms so that they can study everything from basic cellular functions to the effects of drug therapies. In the race to find the best model, the field of organoids has rapidly matured. To  … Read more

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CZI panelists say basic science holds key to cures for neurodegenerative diseases

A panel discussion, “The Challenge of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Will Cell Biology Hold the Answer?” hosted by the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), yielded lively discussion about the direction of basic scientific research. The discussion was one of several satellite events held during the 2017 ASCB|EMBO meeting  … Read more

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Sold-out doorstep meeting engages attendees with recent findings on neurodegenerative diseases

The speakers at ASCB’s second Doorstep Meeting, held on the Saturday prior to the official beginning of the 2017 ASCB|EMBO Meeting in Philadelphia, focused on current discoveries and potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to hearing about these leading-edge investigations, attendees at the sold-out  … Read more

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ASCB council discusses publishing, approves reduced membership rates for scientists from low-income countries

The ASCB Council met December 1, 2017, prior to the ASCB|EMBO Meeting in Philadelphia. The day was jam-packed with updates from staff and committee chairs. The morning kicked off with a welcome to new Council members whose terms began January 2018. They included ASCB President-Elect  … Read more

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Pushing the boundaries of cell biology: Highlights of the 2017 ASCB|EMBO meeting

Nearly 7,000 scientists gathered in Philadelphia in December to learn, share, network, and celebrate all things cell biology at the 2017 ASCB|EMBO Meeting. The five-day meeting included daily poster sessions featuring more than 2,500 posters, six major Symposia, 25 Minisymposia, 18 Microsymposia, 24 Member-Organized Special  … Read more

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In Memoriam: Ian R. Gibbons, 86, dynein discoverer

Ian Gibbons, a long-time visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, died January 30, 2018. He was 86. Gibbons had been a member of ASCB since 1961. He was noted for his discovery of the motor protein dynein.Together with Ron Vale of the University  … Read more

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