Scientists and Patients Benefit from a Novel Approach to Legislating

Congress gets criticized for many things, but sometimes it gets things right and should be complimented. One of the times it got things right was the way it approached legislation to revamp the U.S. drug discovery process. In 2014, Rep. Fred Upton (R-MI) realized that the path from research l...

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E.E. Just Lecturer Tells URM Scientists, “We Need You and We Need Your Ideas”

The ASCB’s E.E. Just Award comes with a medal, a named lecture, and a two-edged message for minority scientists today, according to this year’s winner, Daniel Cólon-Ramos of the Yale School of Medicine. The lecture is in honor of Ernest Everett Just, an early 20th century African-American schol...

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ASCB Ensures Access to Conferences for Federal Scientists

Otto von Bismarck is reported to have said, “Laws are like sausages. It is better not to see them being made.” While it is likely that Bismarck was referring to the contents of laws and the process by which they were made, the time it takes to create the laws is not something pleasant to wat...

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Distill. Get to the Point: Winner of ASCB Elevator Speech Contest Reveals All

Six months ago, if you’d asked any of my family or friends whether I had a chance to win the ASCB 60-Second Elevator Speech Contest, you might’ve gotten a diplomatic “Maaaaybe.” These poor innocents had often sat, bored and confused, their faces politely blank, as I droned on about my work. ...

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Membrane Fission: It Takes a Crowd

Biologists have long believed that cell membrane fission occurs after epsin molecules wedge themselves into the membrane’s surface, causing small pits that eventually bulge out and separate into new membrane structures. But researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have discovered a prev...

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Leveraging the Ever-Growing CRISPR-Cas9 Biology Toolkit

When CRISPR-Cas9 came on the scene in early 2013, the talk swirling around it focused on embryonic gene editing or whether it could be used to treat disease. But molecular biologists realized almost immediately what this cool new tool could mean for lab work. They’ve been hacking the molecular ...

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On the Way to Causing Microcephaly, Zika Blocks Centriole Biogenesis

Although the Zika virus tends to cause few, if any, symptoms in the adults it infects, its effects on embryos and fetuses can be devastating. Outbreaks in Brazil and Central America only in the past year have been tied to increases in congenital neurodevelopmental conditions, particularly microcepha...

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ASCB 2016 Elevator Speech Video Contest Winners: What Amazon.com Can Teach Us about Cell Protein Delivery Systems

You can buy almost anything on Amazon.com but Steven DelSignore, a postdoc at Brandeis University found a cellular metaphor, free of charge, in the online retailer’s warehouse system. He compared Amazon’s sorting and dispatch system to protein sorting and trafficking in cells. The metaphor and D...

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Quality Control

Research in biology is driven by the constant tension between what we know (much) and what we don’t (much more). Take the question of the transcription of messenger RNA in the cell nucleus. Rob Singer of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, NY, who has pioneered new micr...

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Figuring Out the Folds: Biomimicry and Tissue Origami

If we could engineer human organs and other tissues, we could move beyond the need for donor organs and perhaps screen potential new medical therapies on manufactured tissues before going into clinical trials. Unfortunately, however, the complexity of how different types of human tissue knit themsel...

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