Cell News—Cytoskeleton regulator affects nucleus shape in migrating and invading cells

Metastasis is a worst-case scenario for someone with cancer, and certain cellular processes make cancer cells more likely to metastasize. In migrating cells the protein fascin regulates F-actin, a structural component that helps cells keep their shape and move. Fascin expression is correlated wit...

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Young, Gifted, and First-Generation Minority Science Students Motivated by ‘Prosocial’ Values

There are as many motives as there are undergraduates taking introductory science courses, but if you look closely at groups of freshman science students such as those from underrepresented minority (URM) backgrounds, you can see striking motivational differences across and within these groups. That...

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Persistence Makes the Difference in Minority Participation in Science Careers, Wisconsin Researchers Say

The problem of persistence has long troubled undergraduate programs hoping to guide promising students from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups into science careers, but a new study by science education researchers at the University of Wisconsin says that the problem appears to be translating ...

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Cellular Communities of Bacteria and More Coalesce at ASCB 2016

Bacteria may seem like exceedingly simple and lonely organisms, but more and more evidence shows they can communicate, act collectively, and respond to their changing environments. At the 2016 ASCB Annual Meeting “Cellular Communities” Symposium, Bonnie Bassler, professor at Princeton University...

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Cell News—Molecular teamwork makes dynein stronger

The Olympics isn’t the only place where teams are competing to be the strongest. In cells a molecular tug-of-war pulls cargo along microtubule tracks, and kinesin is thought to be the strongest motor protein, producing 6 pN of force. The motor protein dynein acts in the opposite direction, but w...

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Researcher Who Made the Fly Fly Again in Genetics Criticizes NIH Narrowing of Model Organism Support

"The NIH’s broad and species-diverse program of basic research during the last 60 years generated a revolution in our understanding of biology and medicine,” writes Allan S. Spradling, professor at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Baltimore and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute invest...

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Cell News—Structure of hook that connects cargo to motors

Inside cells, cargo is carried inside tiny bubbles and pulled along tracks by molecular motors. But like a boxcar on a train track, something has to connect the cargo container to the locomotive engine for the cargo to move. Courtney Schroeder, member of ASCB’s Committee for Postdocs and Students ...

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Biophysicist Eva Nogales Named 2016 Porter Lecturer

Eva Nogales, a University of California, Berkeley professor, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory senior faculty member, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, will give the 2016 Keith Porter Lecture at ASCB 2016 this December in San Francisco. Nogales has revolutionized the structur...

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Daniel Alfonso Colón-Ramos, A Student with 1,000 Questions, Wins E.E. Just Award

Daniel Alfonso Colón-Ramos always liked asking questions. Growing up in Puerto Rico, his questions earned him a lousy reputation among teachers. But now as a professor of Cell Biology and Neuroscience at Yale, Colón-Ramos’ endless inquiries have led him to win ASCB’s 2016 E.E. Just Award f...

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Last Call for Celldance 2016 Proposals—What? Why? And Finally When?

Imagine yourself sitting in a bar with labmates, celebrating your latest cell imaging videos that you are screening on a computer tablet. A complete stranger standing next to you glances over your shoulder and is fascinated. She asks a few questions. You tell her the story of these images—what the...

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