Promote Public Awareness of Science with a COMPASS Outreach Grant —Deadline Approaching!

The Outreach Subommittee of the ASCB Committee for Postdocs and Students (COMPASS) is inviting applications for the first Outreach Grant cycle of 2017 to be submitted by February 15, 2017!

COMPASS Outreach Grants provide funds to ASCB members to promote science outreach efforts, to help people understand the importance of our work, and improve the perception of scientists.

Previous Outreach Grants have supported diverse projects that inform and excite the public about cell biology research.

We encourage ideas like:

  • Organizing a Student Day in a lab!
  • Hosting a science fair
  • Publicly displaying cell art

These grants (of up to $1,000) can be used for materials, equipment, books or brochures, transportation, prizes, food and refreshments, etc.

Awardees will have the support of a COMPASS member, who will be a liaison between you and the ASCB. Funded events must occur during the 2017 calendar year. We will have a second application cycle in fall 2017, but we encourage you to apply early for your upcoming events!

Please visit www.ascb.org/2014/blog/compass-outreach-grants for details on how to submit your application.

If you have any additional questions you may direct them to Outreach Committee Co-chairs: Scott Wilkinson and Ashley Rowland.

About the Author:


Ashley Rowland is a postdoctoral fellow in Michael Rape's lab at the University of California at Berkeley studying ubiquitin regulation. She is interested in understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control neural developmental programs and cell fate. She earned her PhD with Gia Voeltz at the University of Colorado at Boulder using live-cell microscopy to uncover coordinated functions between the ER and endosomes. In addition to her research she is passionate about improving STEM education and advocating for diversity and access. Email: ashleyrowland@berkeley.edu Twitter: @AshAnnRowland
Scott Wilkinson is currently a postdoctoral fellow in Adam Sowalsky's lab at the National Cancer Institute studying mechanisms of prostate cancer resistance. He earned his PhD in 2016 with Adam Marcus at Emory University, studying the role of LKB1 in regulating actin dynamics and cellular polarization. Scott's passions revolve around teaching and community outreach, having taught numerous courses and conducting several community outreach events during his graduate work.

Recommended Articles