Science Highlights from ASCB 2013: Membranes, Nano-magnets, and the Errant Protein Behind a Cerebellar Disorder

Modeling membranes, nano-magnets to control cell activity, and a gain-of-function protein behind a severe progressive brainstem disorder were hot topics at the 2013 ASCB Annual Meeting in New Orleans, December 14-18. This year, ASCB continued the tradition of weaving two scientific threads—bioph...

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No Hocus Pocus, Nano-Magnets Control Cell Movement

Mathieu Coppey imagines using tiny magnets to move cells within living organisms. Coppey, a researcher at the Institut Curie in Paris, isn’t envisioning a modern day version of “magnet therapy” touted a century ago by quack medical practitioners. Instead Coppey is using nanoparticle-size mag...

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Professional Media Training at ASCB 2013 Spiced Up My Presentation

Aside from Google Hangouts and Skype, it was the first time I'd been on video since my friend caught me singing to Spice Girls several years ago. I'd picked a high pressure venue for my return to video—the ASCB Annual Meeting in New Orleans. I was scheduled to give a short talk on Monday about sci...

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The “Cellular Oscars,” Celldance 2013 Video Awards Roll Out a Tiny Red Carpet

Time-lapse movies of a cellular “heaven and hell,” a dividing crane fly sperm cell undergoing, and the early development of muscle cells were recognized with the top three awards in the American Society for Cell Biology’s Celldance “Really Useful” Cell Biology Video Contest for 2013. The...

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ASCB 2013 Twitter Highlights

Here’s what happened at the 2013 ASCB Annual Meeting as told by Twitter users: [<a href="//storify.com/ASCBiology/ascb-2013" target="_blank">View the story &#8220;ASCB 2013 Twitter Highlights&#8221; on Storify</a>] ...

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Twitter Reactions to ASCB 2013

Here’s what people said on Twitter about the 2013 ASCB meeting in New Orleans:   [<a href="//storify.com/ASCBiology/ascb-2013-reactions" target="_blank">View the story &#8220;ASCB 2013 Reactions&#8221; on Storify</a>] ...

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Controlling Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species Weakens Bacterial Biofilms and Breaks Cycle of Unhealing Wounds

It may begin as a “simple” foot blister, but for patients with type 2 diabetes there is nothing simple about wounds that won’t heal. That blister can evolve into a seriously infected wound that refuses to heal and, if gangrene develops, the patient’s foot may have to be amputated. Such “...

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Following the Link from Gaucher Disease to Parkinson’s Disease

It seems an unlikely connection, and yet there is a significant link between Gaucher disease (GD), a purely genetic disease affecting lipid storage, and Parkinson’s disease, a largely untreatable progressive degenerative movement disorder of the central nervous system that is often without a cle...

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Suppressing the Microtubule-Cutting Enzyme, Fidgetin, Allows Injured Adult Nerves to Regrow

We talk about “hard wiring” the brain but our central nervous system is a work in progress. From the first neuron through childhood and adolescence, the neuronal network grows in complexity and size but also prunes out unneeded connections using molecules like the recently characterized enzyme...

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A Gene Called Sunday Driver Steers Researchers to Answers for Congenital Muscle Disease

A whimsically named fly gene, Sunday Driver, a.k.a. syd, and its mammalian analog, JIP3, seem to be in the driver’s seat when it comes to parking the multiple nuclei of a skeletal muscle cell in their correct places, say researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI). Getting that wrong and ha...

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