Everything Else

Gaia Cantelli

Gaia obtained her PhD from King's College, London working on melanoma cell plasticity and how it affects metastasis and patient survival. She has since moved to the United States, where she is currently a lecturing fellow at Duke University. Her work focuses on understanding how breast cancer metastasizes to the bone and manipulates the tumor micro-environment. She loves writing about science and communicating her passion for all things biology. You can find more of her writing here: https://time4science.wordpress.com/


Ashley Lakoduk

Ashley is a PhD candidate in the lab of Sandra Schmid at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. She is investigating the mechanisms of focal adhesion turnover by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Email: ashley.lakoduk@utsouthwestern.edu Twitter: @alakoduk


COMPASS: Who are we?

COMPASS, or Committee for Postdocs and Students, are a group composed of graduate students and postdocs who represent the interests of trainees within ASCB. Our committee members come from institutes and universities all around the world! For example, Gaia, a co-author of this post, did her  … Read more

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Writing as a scientist: a skill for life

In today’s intense research environment, scientists must become effective communicators in order to gain a competitive edge and to make a difference in their communities. Explaining science to the public is an essential skill for any scientist, whether it is to engage with the public  … Read more

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Mentoring undergraduates: all you need to know to help your summer student

This is another post in a series highlighting the collaboration between COMPASS and CBE—Life Sciences Education (LSE)–featuring some of the exciting work that is being done to understand how we learn about science and how science careers impact the people who work in both academia  … Read more

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The science of science careers: never too late to consider options

This is the first post in a series highlighting the collaboration between COMPASS and CBE—Life Sciences Education (LSE)–featuring some of the exciting work that is being done to understand how we learn about science and how science careers impact the people who work in both  … Read more

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Five fun ways to keep up with science outside your job

Remember before science was your job? Chances are, you were a science-lover who read up on and was curious about all different types of science. I certainly used to be excited about all things science, from neuroscience to botany to astrophysics. However, the day science  … Read more

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Burnout syndrome: five ways to keep it together

Science is an extremely intensive endeavor. The erratic hours, the long experiments in the lab, and the repeated streaks of inconsistent or negative data together take a toll. What’s more, science is stressful. Deadlines for grants and various funding applications, committee meetings, project meetings, paper  … Read more

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Five tips for transitioning from PhD to postdoc

The end of your PhD is one of the most hectic times of your life. You have a huge list of experiments to finish, papers to complete, a thesis to write, a defense to prepare for, as well as the small matter of applying for  … Read more

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The importance of mentorship: how to make the most of who you know

Right after handing in my doctoral thesis I had the great opportunity to intern with Cancer Research UK, which is one of the most active science funding bodies in Europe and one of the most interesting places to work that I have ever come across.  … Read more

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Five ways to make the most of your conference experience

Attending conferences is one of the most important parts of being a scientist. You get to connect with other researchers from all over the world and share your work with them, gaining precious feedback and hopefully returning home full of new ideas. It’s a chance  … Read more

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Five ways to prepare yourself to become a postdoc

The end of a PhD is undoubtedly the end of an era. You’ve worked hard, and your work has paid off. You are now a full-fledged Doctor of Philosophy. You successfully played the field and got yourself a postdoctoral position in your dream lab. You’re  … Read more

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