Rescuing the Golgi Puts Brakes on Alzheimer’s Progression

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progresses inside the brain in a rising storm of cellular chaos as deposits of the toxic protein, amyloid-beta (Aβ), overwhelm neurons. An apparent side effect of accumulating Aβ in neurons is the fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, the part of the cell involved in p...

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New “Alzheimer’s in a Dish” Model Uses Skin Cells to Make Induced Neurons That Express Amyloid-beta and Tau

The search for a living laboratory model of human neurons in the grip of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)—the so-called “Alzheimer’s in a dish”—has a new candidate. In work presented at the ASCB/IFCB meeting in Philadelphia, Håkan Toresson and colleagues at Lund University in Sweden report ...

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The 2014 ASCB Kaluza Prize sponsored by Beckman-Coulter

The Kaluza Prizes honors the best in graduate student bioscience research. The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), in collaboration with Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, gave cash awards of $5,000 to Josie Clowney, $3,000 to Eunyong Park, and $1,000 to Jiaxi Wu. (more…)...

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A Little Night Music, A Lot of Cell Biology—The Two Lives of Larry Goldfinger

Saturday night, Larry Goldfinger was wailing on his clarinet, punching out Bulgarian wedding music and Romanian ballads with his Balkan brass band in the lobby of the Pennsylvania Convention Center in central Philadelphia. Goldfinger’s West Philadelphia Orchestra was entertaining for the openi...

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Superstar Scientists Share Visions for the Future of Research at ASCB/IFCB Meeting

A panel of bioscience superstars tried to throw some light on the gloomy outlook for cell research Saturday at the ASCB/IFCB 2014 meeting in Philadelphia. As NIH funding shrinks, graduate programs grow, and fewer than 10% of PhDs go on to tenure-track position, Bruce Alberts, professor at Univer...

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Celldance 2014

“Killing Cancer, Cytotoxic T-Cells on Patrol” by Alex Ritter, NIH Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program, is one of three “Tell Your Own Cell Story” videos commissioned by Celldance Studios, a.k.a. the ASCB’s Public Information Committee (PIC). “Companio...

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Gravity—It’s the Law Even for Cells

Everybody knows that cells are microscopic, but why? Why aren’t cells bigger? The average animal cell is 10 microns across and the traditional explanation has been cells are the perfect size because if they were any bigger it would be difficult to get enough nutrients and energy to support the...

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Blood Brain Barrier on a Chip Could Stand in for Children in Pediatric Brain Research

In the human brain, the BBB is not the Better Business Bureau but the blood brain barrier and the BBB is serious business in human physiology. The human BBB separates circulating blood from the central nervous system, thus protecting the brain from many infections and toxins. But the BBB also bl...

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Foldscope Inventor Manu Prakash Shows Students How to Reveal Aliens

An alien-like creature came in and out of focus on two large screens in a Philadelphia conference room yesterday. You could see tiny hairs on its many rows of feet, blood vessels under its translucent skin, its antennae scanning the environment. As remarkable as the picture of this polychaete wo...

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