Novel Insights into the Role of Biomechanics in Cell Biology

In this webinar, Bruker BioAFM and two special guest speakers will speak on the pivotal role that mechanobiology plays in shaping our understanding of cell biology and fundamental biological mechanisms. The speakers will provide insights into their research and outline how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the biomechanical properties of cells and tissues, how cells respond to their extracellular environment and biological and mechanical cues, and how cell morphology can change during pathogenesis. AFM, an advanced multi-parametric imaging technique that delivers 3D topographic images of living biological systems in the nm-range, enables the characterization of the nanomechanical properties of cells and tissues and the visualization of structural changes taking place at the molecular level. AFM can be fully integrated into advanced light microscopy techniques and seamlessly combined with fluorescence, confocal and super-resolution microscopy.

In this virtual symposium, you will:

  1. How AFM can be used to study the morphology of brain endothelial cells and the viscoelastic properties of epithelial cells;
  2. Novel approaches for studying dynamic mechanical changes in cells and tissues and their role in morphogenesis;
  3. How AFM, a non-invasive technique that can be performed under near-physiological conditions, enables the high-resolution structural analysis of cell membranes, cell morphology, and molecular structures at the nanometer scale.

Speakers:

Andreas Janshoff, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Goettingen, Germany

Andreas Janshoff is Professor for Biophysical Chemistry at the University of Göttingen. His research foscues on the fields of membrane biophysics, cell mechanics, single-molecule force spectroscopy, and sensor design. His department studies the passive and active mechanics of biological systems with the aim of revealing how the structure and function of biological molecules are related, and the role that cellular mechanics play in biological processes, such as cell migration, cell growth, embryogenesis, and oncogenesis. They use atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers to study nanostructure dynamics and interaction processes in the nano- to femto-Newton force range and at below millisecond resolution (e.g., nucleocytoplasmic transport).

Dr. Kimberly Stroka, Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, USA

Dr. Kimberly Stroka received her PhD in Bioengineering from the University of Maryland, USA and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on quantitative cell mechanobiology, biomechanics, the use of microfluidic devices for modeling physiological systems, nano/microtechnology, and live cell imaging. In her work at The Cell and Microenvironment Engineering Lab, she studies the interplay between mechanical and biochemical cues from the cellular microenvironment and their influence on cellular behavior during normal homeostasis, progression of diseases, and therapeutic treatments. By engineering cells and their microenvironment to create model systems, the lab aims to systematically understand fundamental aspects of cell and tissue mechanobiology, with the long-term goals of advancing scientific knowledge and directing new therapeutic strategies for diseases.

 

Moderators:

Florian Kumpfe, Bruker BioAFM Berlin

Andreas Janshoff is Professor for Biophysical Chemistry at the University of Göttingen. His research focuses on the fields of membrane biophysics, cell mechanics, single-molecule force spectroscopy, and sensor design. His department studies the passive and active mechanics of biological systems with the aim of revealing how the structure and function of biological molecules are related, and the role that cellular mechanics play in biological processes, such as cell migration, cell growth, embryogenesis, and oncogenesis. They use atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers to study nanostructure dynamics and interaction processes in the nano- to femto-Newton force range and at below millisecond resolution (e.g., nucleocytoplasmic transport).

 

Sponsor

 


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Details

Starts: October 10, 2023 10:00 am Eastern

Ends: October 10, 2023 11:15 am Eastern

Cost: $0 for ASCB Members; $0 for Non-members