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Exhibitor Tech Talks

Sunday

8:15–9:15 am
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall A
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Workflows and Tools for Advanced Analysis of Exosomes and Parental Cells
Presenter: Alexander “Sasha” Vlassov
Level: Intermediate

9:30 10:30 am
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
GE Healthcare
Diving Deeper: Advances in 3D Automated Microscopy Solutions with Quantitative Image Analysis
Presenter: Lynne Turnbull, Validation Scientist - Cell Analysis, GE Healthcare
Level: Intermediate

Microscopy tools continually evolve with changing research trends, resulting in a large breadth of current applications and potential to advance research in completely new areas. Recent adoption of 3D cell culture models and generation of high dimensional phenotypes have already generated enough success stories to signal that the automated microscopy imaging community is on a promising path toward disruptive change. However, the use of microtissues and more comprehensive computational methods present new challenges. To maximize the utility of these technologies for microscopy applications, innovations in automation and interpretation of the exponentially larger and more complex datasets will be critical. GE Healthcare’s Cell Analysis team will share how we facilitate advancements in microscopy and automated imaging by developing products that not only provide researchers access to cutting edge methods, but also address the overarching complexities that arise when combining the methods into a single workflow that can generate reliable results.

 

10:45-11:45 am
Theater 2, Exhibit Hall
MIMETAS B.V.
The Missing Link in Cell Culture: In Vitro Vascularization of Human Organoids and Tissue Explants
Presenters: Jos Joore, Dorota Kurek, and Marianna Kruithof-de Julio
Level: Intermediate

The OrganoPlate® Graft is the first microfluidic cell culture platform that allows you to study the vascularisation of 3D tissues in vitro. While functional blood vessels are vital for the functioning of organs and the body as a whole, they are lacking in all the currently available in vitro cell culture techniques. The OrganoPlate Graft is a newly developed version of the OrganoPlate based on the unique technology developed by MIMETAS. It is designed to grow functional microvessels in a chip to create a microvascular bed. Tissue placed onto this bed can be connected to the system of human blood vessels, allowing in vitro vascularization. In this session we will introduce the platform and its applications. Following this introduction Dr. Marianna Kruithof-de Julio will present the work that she has performed with the OrganoPlate Graft. Her presentation will focus on overcoming the issues of tumor heterogeneity in drug research by creating a complex model to study drug treatment effectiveness by combining organoid technology with the OrganoPlate Graft. With this approach they aim to better mimic the in vivo systemic administration of compounds and to study the contribution of the vascular network in therapy response.

 

10:45-11:45 am
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
GE Healthcare
Advances in Bio-molecular Imaging in Life Sciences
Presenter: Phil Beckett, Application Scientist - Lab Analysis, GE Healthcare
Level: Intermediate

State of the art life science imaging, e.g., for detecting proteins or DNA in membranes and gels, have so far relied on CCD detectors with on-chip binning, large-aperture lenses, and LED based illumination in dark cabinets. The key challenge in these systems is how to avoid detector saturation while obtaining high-resolution images of a wide variety of samples, with the highest possible sensitivity. In addition, time-varying sample signals (such as in chemiluminescence detection) may require multiple captures to find optimal exposure times. We present a novel strategy to extend the dynamic range, which opens up the possibility to capture images with both high sensitivity and high resolution.

 

12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
MilliporeSigma, the life science business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany
Winning Westerns: Proven Strategies to Optimize Your Western Blots
Presenter: Anja Dedeo, R&D Manager, MilliporeSigma, the life science business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany
Level: Introductory

Does Western blotting give you more trouble than expected? Do you feel like your precious samples are being wasted on bad Westerns? Join us and find out how you can improve your Western blots! In this seminar, you will learn general guidelines for performing and troubleshooting your Westerns, such as: • Choice of different blotting membranes • Parameters affecting blotting efficiency • Conditions for optimizing your immunodetection • Do more with time-saving options of SNAP i.d.® 2.0 and Immobilon® GO As the inventors of PVDF Immobilon® membranes, MilliporeSigma knows how informative a good Western can be. Bring your research questions to get the most out of this session.

 

12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 2, Exhibit Hall
Carl Zeiss Microscopy, LLC
Studying Transcription and Chromatin Dynamics in Flies with High Resolution, Speed, and Sensitivity
Presenter: Robert J. Johnston Jr.
Level: Intermediate

Stochastic cell fate specification diversifies cells during development. How cells randomly choose between two or more fates remains poorly understood. In the fly eye the random mosaic of two R7 photoreceptor subtypes is determined by expression of the transcription factor Spineless (Ss). Here we use confocal microscopy to identify a two-step mechanism governing stochastic R7 subtype specification. In the first step, an early enhancer drives ss expression in R7 precursors that opens the ss locus. In the second step, transcription ceases, chromatin variably compacts, and repression limits activation by a late enhancer to a random subset of R7s. ss remains expressed in a subset of R7s and repressed in the complementary subset to determine the random pattern. Our work identifies a “prime and boost” mechanism adapted for stochastic cell fate specification. Identifying the source of molecular noise that drives stochastic processes is challenging. To advance our studies, we needed to conduct imaging experiments with high resolution, speed, and sensitivity, beyond the capabilities of standard confocal microscopy. To address our needs, we turned to the ZEISS LSM 980 with Airyscan 2. With this microscope, we established a system to image transcription in ex vivo retinas for 24 hours, visualizing transcription and chromatin dynamics during development. Beyond the fly eye, we use the powerful ZEISS LSM 980 to image large tissues at high resolution, including human retinas and organoids.

 

1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
Andor Technology
The Characterization of Back-Illuminated sCMOS Cameras and Their Use in Microscopy Applications
Presenter: Alan Mullan, PhD
Level: Introductory

Selecting the most suitable camera for a specific research application can be a difficult task. There is a wide range of models available based on different technologies such as sCMOS and CCD. The technical specifications of these cameras may vary and it is not clear how these sometimes seemingly small differences may impact camera performance in a given application. The key to selecting the most suitable camera is by combining several key specifications with the needs of the application. For many fluorescence microscopy based applications the most important parameters to consider are: sensitivity, speed, resolution and field of view. A further subset of factors such as: dark current noise, dynamic range, shuttering modes, connectivity or vibration can also be used to determine suitability. Recently cameras based on back-illuminated sCMOS sensor technology have become available which promise improvements in sensitivity. How does this new generation of sCMOS cameras compare against the existing sCMOS and EMCCD models? Are they the most suitable camera for all applications? We attempt to address these questions by characterising the performance of one of these new models using the above performance criteria, the Sona back-illuminated sCMOS camera.

 

1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 2, Exhibit Hall
Carl Zeiss Microscopy, LLC
Using Structured Illumination Microscopy to Reveal the Inner Workings of the Immunological Synapse
Presenter: John A. Hammer, Senior Investigator, Cell and Developmental Biology Center, NHLBI, NIH
Level: Intermediate

Central to the function of both T cells and B cells is the intimate contact they make with antigen-bearing target cells known as the immunological synapse. Work from many labs including my own has shown that synapse creation requires large-scale reorganizations of the lymphocyte’s actin cytoskeleton in the plane of contact with the target cell. What results are robust inward flows of actin and actomyosin that serve to organize the immune cell’s antigen receptors, adhesion receptors and other molecules to promote its ultimate function—target cell killing in the case of cytotoxic T cells, and antigen extraction in the case of B cells. In this talk I will describe our efforts to reveal the complex organization and dynamics of these cytoskeletal flows using classical structured illumination microscopy (SIM) merged with total internal reflection illumination (TIRF). The challenge moving forward is to image these dynamic events in the context of immune cell: target cell conjugates so that we may better understand how the actomyosin forces generated at the synapse are harnessed to drive target cell killing and antigen extraction. I will close, therefore, with a discussion of why imaging these conjugates in 4D using Lattice-SIM may provide the necessary resolution, sensitivity and speed to answer these key questions.

 

2:00 - 2:45 pm
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Thermo Fisher Scientific: Cutting Edge Viral and Non-viral Delivery Platforms for T-Cell Engineering and Beyond
Presenter: Dr. Namritha Ravinder, Senior R&D Manager, Cell Biology, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Level: Intermediate

Growing demand for precision therapy and the recent successes with CAR-T cells for cancer treatment has put the spot light on Cell and Gene Therapy Applications. However, the difficulty of delivering relevant payloads into immune and other challenging cells remains to be a major bottle neck to rapid advancement from bench to clinic. Most studies have been focused on using viruses to engineer T cells. At the same time due to safety concerns with viral vectors there is also lot of demand and investment in non-viral based methods to maximize gene editing efficiencies in immune cells especially to meet increasing demand for developing allogeneic immune cell therapies.

This talk will cover recent advancements we have made in delivery tools for genome editing, immune cell engineering and in vivo delivery applications. More specifically we will be addressing the following 4 focus areas.

 

  • Nucleic acid delivery solutions for hard-to-transfect primary & immune cell
  • Delivery of genome editing tools like CRISPR-Cas9 with electroporation or transfection reagents
  • Scalable and high yield Lentivirus production platform for cell and gene therapy applications
  • In vivo delivery of mRNA and siRNA with Invivofectamine™ reagents.

 

2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 2, Exhibit Hall
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Tools to Empower Your Research from the Allen Institute For Cell Science–From Cell Lines and Images to Information and Models
Presenter: Allen Institute for Cell Science
Level: Introductory

The Allen Institute for Cell Science is creating an image-based landscape of human induced pluripotent stem cell states and the mechanisms underlying transitions among these states. To do this, the Institute has created publicly available tools for the cell biology community for discovery, analysis, and visualization. These include: 1) genome edited hiPS cell lines for visualizing each of the major structures in epithelial cells and cardiomyocytes, as well as a new set of cell lines for structures in the nucleus, 2) large, high replicate image datasets derived from these cell lines, 3) automation methods for image acquisition, 4) image analysis tools, both computer vision and machine learning, for quantifying structures from 3D images, and 5) new visualization methods. This talk will be an introduction to the resources the Allen Institute makes publicly available through allencell.org, along with use cases for researchers seeking to leverage the tools in their own labs.

 

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
Bruker Luxendo Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM): Seeing Life from a Different Angle
Presenter: Dane Maxfield, Ph.D. - Bruker, Western Regional Sales Manager
Level: Intermediate
Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) has become a state-of-the-art imaging method to address a wide variety of biological questions. Featuring extremely low phototoxicity, high-speed image acquisition, and large penetration depth, LSFM allows for long-term 3D imaging of large and delicate samples. Luxendo, a Bruker Company, has developed specialized light-sheet platforms to image a variety of samples with specific requirements. In this presentation, we will focus on the InVi-SPIM and QuVi-SPIM and how these can be used for a variety of applications.  The InVi-SPIM is optimized for long-term 3D imaging of delicate samples. We will describe our innovative sample mounting technique and demonstrate the ease of use for a variety of specimens ranging from cell culture to organoids and embryos.  The InVi-SPIM Lattice Pro introduces a new level of flexibility to LSFM by allowing for fast easy switching of illumination beam shapes - lattice light-sheet, Bessel beam, Airy beam, and Gaussian beam - to suit the specific requirements of your sample. The QuVi-SPIM features symmetric illumination and detection objectives in an upright geometry. The dual views and dual detection channels enable large-scale imaging of living samples mounted on slides, SBS plates and of large cleared-samples. From this presentation you can expect to learn the advantages of LSFM for high resolution cellular imaging and how this technique can be adapted to your everyday imaging.

 

3:00-4:00 pm
Theater 2, Exhibit Hall B
DRVisions
The future of image analysis – Aivia
Presenter: Luciano A. G. Lucas, PhD
Level: Intermediate

Over the past three years, Aivia has quickly developed an armada of high-performance intelligent tools for visualization, automated analysis and interactive data exploration of large, 2- to-4D microscopy image data. Aivia benefits from 20 years of focused R&D of image-based machine learning (ML) applications. Our Tech Talk will bring you up to date with Aivia’s full range of functionally. Starting with an introduction to the Aivia platform and how you can complete routine tasks at scale using non-ML image analysis tools. In the second part, you will learn about the Pixel Classifier, our GPU-accelerated parameter-free image segmentation framework which uses an innovative blend of fast ML and image analysis heuristics. In the last part, you will learn how to train and apply your own deep learning (DL) models and see how this type of technology can help you master previously unattainable microscopy challenges. The Tech Talk will give you the core concepts of ML / DL and will show you how this type of technology is used in Aivia to boost your productivity. 3 years of updates and support included. Live demos with Aivia 8.8 (Dec 2019): A) Basics: visualization and image analysis solutions at scale. B) Aivia’s Pixel Classifier. Ideal to get results quickly, accurately and at scale without the need to learn advanced image processing functions. C) Aivia Cloud: train and apply DL models without coding. Both deep learning powered image deconvolution and denoising will be discussed.

 

4:15–5:15 pm
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall A
NanoSurface BioMedical
Recreating the Extracellular Matrix in a Dish
Presenter: Hamed Ghazizadeh, PhD, Product Manager, NanoSurface Biomedical
Level: Intermediate

Cells in the body use a variety of cues (e.g. structural, mechanical, electrical, and chemical) from the extracellular matrix (ECM) to develop and mature physiologically. These influential cues help regulate a broad spectrum of processes such as cell signaling, division, and differentiation. Many in vitro platforms seek to incorporate these cues into the cell’s microenvironment, but often fail, suffering from lack of reproducibility and incompatibility with other well-established end-point assays. Here, we demonstrate biomimetic in vitro platforms capable of reliably reproducing these essential ECM cues. These platforms markedly improve the structural and functional development of a variety of cell types, including stem cells, cardiomyocytes, muscle cells, and many more. Specifically, we show how NanoSurface Cultureware, Cytostretcher cell-stretching family of instruments, and eCyte 6 electrical stimulation system can be utilized individually or collectively to study various model systems. The effects of cell-nanotopography interactions on adhesion, signaling, polarity, and migration across many applications such as human epithelia, cardiovascular function, and cancer biology are highlighted. Further, we describe how the differentiation of stem cells can be enhanced by providing a more biomimetic culture environment, with a particular focus on iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. To learn more, visit https://www.nanosurfacebio.com.

 

5:30pm – 6:30pm
Theater 1, Exhibit Hall
OviGenex
CollOvine – Biomaterials applications of ovine collagen
Presenter: Gary Fujii, PhD and Sam On Ho, PhD
Level: Introductory

The advantages of collagen purified from ovine over other sources, such as bovine, will be discussed. Examples of the use of CollOvine in cancer research, stem cell research, drug delivery research and regenerative medicine research will be presented. Innovative collagen derivatives and their applications will also be explored

 

7:00-8:00 pm
Ballroom C
Nikon Instruments Inc.
MINFLUX Nanoscopy and Related Matters
Presenter: Stefan W. Hell
Level: Intermediate

I will show how an in-depth description of the basic principles of diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy (nanoscopy) has spawned a new powerful superresolution concept, namely MINFLUX nanoscopy. MINFLUX utilizes a local excitation intensity minimum (of a doughnut or a standing wave) that is targeted like a probe in order to localize the fluorescent molecule to be registered. In combination with single-molecule switching for sequential registration, MINFLUX has obtained the ultimate (super)resolution: the size of a molecule. MINFLUX nanoscopy, providing 1–3 nanometer resolution in fixed and living cells, is presently being established for routine fluorescence imaging at the highest, molecular-size resolution levels. Relying on fewer detected photons than popular camera-based localization, MINFLUX nanoscopy is poised to open a new chapter in the imaging of protein complexes and distributions in fixed and living cells.

 

Monday
Tuesday