How Cell Biologists Work: Eva Nogales on making pictures of proteins worth a thousand words

Eva Nogales is a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley; a Senior Faculty Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator. The Nogales Lab uses cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to visualize macromolecular protein  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Valentina Greco on cultivating a passionate research team

Valentina Greco is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Genetics, Cell Biology and Dermatology at Yale University, and is a member of the Yale School of Medicine Stem Cell Center and Cancer Center. The Greco lab is shedding new light on the mysterious lives  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Derek Applewhite on introducing undergraduates to the wonders of microscopy

Derek Applewhite is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Reed College, in Portland, Oregon. Applewhite’s lab studies the mechanisms of cytoskeleton regulation that are critical for cell shape change and cell movements. The Applewhite lab uses Drosophila (fruit fly) and Drosophila cells (S2 cells and  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Ron Vale on converting chemical energy into mechanical work and curiosity into discovery

Ron Vale is a professor in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology Department at the University of California, San Francisco and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Vale’s lab studies how the contents of cells are organized, including how molecular motors move cargo to  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Jessica Feldman, from blue monkeys to buying all the lottery tickets

Jessica Feldman is an assistant professor at Stanford University in the Department of Biology. Feldman’s lab is investigating how different types of cells organize their microtubule cytoskeletons and the impact of that on the shapes and functions of cells. The Feldman lab uses the developing  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Gaia Pigino on grace under pressure, making things, understanding cilium

Gaia Pigino is a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG). Her group uses cryo-EM and electron tomography to uncover the structural organization of protein complexes within cilia and flagella. Cilia and flagella are slender protrusions from  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Prachee Avasthi on ‘exuberantly’ tackling elegant experiments and the value of preprints

In this edition of How Cell Biologists Work, we interview  Prachee Avasthi, assistant professor of anatomy and cell biology and assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, KS.  The Avasthi Lab studies the formation and regulation of ciliary  … Read more

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How Cell Biologists Work: Danelle Devenport on how a risky decision shaped her path in science

In this second installment of How Cell Biologists Work, we are fortunate to hear from Danelle Devenport, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University. Devenport’s work is expanding our understanding of how cells are coordinated on a tissue-level scale. Her  … Read more

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