Oct 2013 WEB - page 1

NEWS
LETTER
ASCB
Challenges Ahead
for the Biomedical
Workforce
Page 3
DORA in Action
Page 6
The Individual
Development Plan
as a Career Tool
Page 14
Ins ide
Executive Director’s Column 3
DORA in Action
6
Young French Biologists
6
Bernfield, Gilula Awardees
7
New Orleans Give Back
8
MBL Physiology Course
9
NIGMS Cell Day
11
Local Meeting Highlights
12
WICB Column
14
Public Policy Briefing
19
CLS on Capitol Hill
20
International Affairs
23
Poster Judges Needed
24
2013 Annual Meeting Program 26
Annual Meeting Buddies
30
Did You Know...?
30
Top Stories from Post and Blogs 32
Cell Sightings
35
Highlights from MBoC
36
2013 Member Gifts
38
New Orleans Donations
38
Grants & Opportunities
39
Meetings Calendar
39
Members in the News
39
In Memoriam
41
Dear Labby
42
Scheller Wins 2013 Lasker Award
Big discoveries can turn up in unexpected places, such as neurons
of the Pacific electric ray,
Torpedo
californica.
That was the start
of Richard H. Scheller’s path to the 2013 Albert Lasker Basic
Medical Research Award, which he received on September 20.
Scheller and Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University won for
their independent investigations into the regulatory mechanisms of
neurotransmitter release. (Südhof subsequently won the 2013 Nobel
prize in Physiology or Medicine; see above).
Scheller, a longtime ASCB member now at Genentech, began
his research at Stanford University in the late 1980s with
Torpedo,
a
cartilaginous fish that can deliver a 45-volt shock to its prey. Scheller
and his colleagues began isolating proteins from the fish’s synaptic
vesicles. These vesicles are abundant in the electric organ of
Torpedo
and are remarkably similar to those in the nerve–muscle junctions in
mammals.
Lasker, continued on page 8
O C T O B E R 2 0 1 3
V O L U M E 3 6 , N U M B E R 9
Photo Credit: Genentech
Richard Scheller
Two longtime ASCB members, Randy
Schekman of the University of California,
Berkeley, and James Rothman of Yale
University, have won the 2013 Nobel
Prize in Physiology or Medicine for
their discoveries of how molecules move
through the cell in vesicles and fuse to
target membranes in the process known as
“trafficking.” Schekman, who was ASCB
President in 1999, and Rothman, who
has been an ASCB member since 1982,
will share their joint prize of roughly $1.2
million with Thomas Südhof of Stanford
University for their work in uncovering the
details of how vesicles in the cell move along cytoskeletal roadways, delivering cargoes to different
parts of the cell.
Schekman, who first published his ground-breaking work in 1979, used yeast to discover how
vesicles form, how proteins are selected to be packaged into vesicles, and how these vesicles move
to their proper destination. Over three decades of research, Schekman has discovered more than
50 genes involved in these processes. Schekman, currently a Howard Hughes Medical Institute
investigator, is now using that information to characterize human diseases such as Alzheimer’s
disease. (Learn more about Schekman’s research in his iBioseminars presentation at www.
ibioseminars.org/lectures/bio-mechanisms/randy-schekman.html.)
Nobel, continued on page 6
Schekman, Rothman Share
Nobel Prize
Randy Schekman
James Rothman
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