ASCB Newsletter Nov 2013 - page 23

23
NOVEMBER 2013
ASCB
NEWSLETTER
I am pleased to report that ASCB continues
to thrive financially, and that 2012 was a very
successful year for us.
The 2012 budget anticipated a small
deficit of $18,344. At year end, ASCB’s
total operational revenue (not including
investment gains, losses, interest, or
dividends) was $6,976,549 and total expenses
were $6,411,430, resulting in net operating
revenue of $565,119. Investment revenue was
budgeted at $125,200, whereas we ended the
year with investment gains totaling $207,436,
up $82,236 from budget. Unrealized gains
were $498,366. (Unrealized gains are those
that would be realized if equities or bonds
were sold; their increased value during the
year is reflected in our financial statements.)
Thus we ended 2012 with actual net revenue
of approximately $1.27 million.
Our 2012 income from three program
areas—the Annual Meeting, membership,
and our journal
Molecular Biology of the Cell
(
MBoC
)—once again demonstrated how
critical they are to the financial health of
ASCB. Net revenues for these program areas
in 2012 were:
Annual Meeting, $857,988
Membership, $750,466
MBoC
, $620,115
Revenues from these three areas, along
with federal and private grants, are the
backbone of support for the many other
programs and activities the Society provides
to its members. These include initiatives in
education, public policy, public information,
minority affairs, international affairs, and
women in cell biology, as well as support for
the journal
CBE—Life Sciences Education
(
LSE
), the Coalition for the Life Sciences,
and the
ASCB Newsletter
.
Membership
Membership revenue in 2012 was $957,532.
This consisted mostly of $850,022 from
individual membership dues, $38,500 from
corporate dues, and other revenue including
that from the job board and mailing lists.
Total membership numbers in 2012 were up
ASCB Continued to Thrive
Financially in 2012
slightly from 2011 for a total just shy of 9,000.
Annual Meeting
Attendance at the 2012 Annual Meeting in
San Francisco was higher than at the Denver
(2011) meeting and similar to attendance in
Philadelphia (2010). The Annual Meeting is a
critical revenue source for the Society. In 2012
revenues totaled $2,761,182, of which 48%
($1,325,902) came from corporate support for
exhibits, showcases, and tutorials; advertising;
travel and childcare awards; and other support.
In 2012 ASCB members attending the
meeting also benefited from support from the
National Institutes of Health National Institute
of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) via the
Minorities Access to Research Careers (MARC)
grant, which provided approximately $186,353
of support for travel, poster and speaker awards,
the Educational Resources/Minorities Affairs
booth, and a grant writing workshop.
ASCB staff members think creatively each
year to raise funds to help keep membership rates
and meeting registration rates as low as possible.
The membership needs to know that the ASCB
staff do not wait for Annual Meeting costs to
“happen”—they always work diligently to reduce
them beforehand. ASCB also saved more than
$237,000 from budget on contract services for
audiovisual services, labor, security, advertising,
printing, and credit card fees. Ultimately, the net
revenue from the 2012 meeting was $857,988.
Grants also helped support aspects of the
Annual Meeting in 2012. Grants from the
Ellison Foundation and the Burroughs Wellcome
Fund supported meeting activities including
events organized by the Minorities Affairs
and Women in Cell Biology Committees. A
portion of a 5-year, $60,000 grant from Nature
Publishing Group was used to support childcare
awards at the meeting. Together these grants
totaled about $42,000 in 2012.
MBoC
In 2012 revenues from
MBoC
totaled
$1,103,344. These revenues came from page
charges, totaling just over $591,000; library
subscriptions of close to $478,000; as well as
ASCB staff
members think
creatively
each year to
raise funds
to help keep
membership
rates and
meeting
registration
rates as low
as possible.
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