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ASCB Newsletter - September 1999

Classifieds
  09/01/1999

Postdoctoral position available to study the mechanisms of induction and progression of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. The project will involve in vivo models of the disease as well as investigations of growth factors and intracellular signaling pathways in isolated vascular cells. Individuals with expertise in studies of macrophages and/or vascular biology are particularly encouraged to apply. Send CV, brief description of research experience and interests, and names of three references to: Karin Bornfeldt, Ph.D., Dept. of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Box 357470, Seattle, WA 98195-7470. Fax: 206-543-3644, Email.

3 year postdoctoral position available to participate in a project on CaM kinase targeting domains. Experience in digital image analysis, enzymology and PCR-mediated mutagenesis are desirable. Potential exists for developing own project into areas of cancer biology, neurobiology and signal transduction. Send CV, a statement of research interests and career goals and contact information for 3 references to: Dr. Robert M. Tombes, Massey Cancer Center, MCV, Virginia Commonwealth University, Box 980230, Richmond VA 23298, (804) 828-5781 or Email.

Postdoctoral position available to study the protective effects of molecular chaperones (HSP27, HSP70) on the nucleus, cytoskeleton, and proton pumps in human tumor cells adapted to growth at low pH. Desire applicants with experience in image analysis, FCM, and molelcular techniques. The fellow will interact with a well funded multidisciplinary group developing approaches for sensitization of solid tumors to therapy. Send c.v. with references and letter of interest to Ronald A. Coss, Ph.D., Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, 111 S. 11th Street, Philadelphia, PA. 19107. Fax: (215) 955-5825. Email. Equal Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action.

Postdoctoral Positions. #1) Developmental study of CNS neurons, sensory ganglion and receptors in co-culture and transplantation experiments; #2) Plastic/regulatory changes in channels and receptors in degeneration and growth of synaptic endings in the CNS. Cell/molecular methods, immuno EM and confocal microscopy, cell culture, patch clamp . Project direction flexible, including transgenic mice; funded for vertebrate auditory system. Competitive salary. Research or Training grant. Contact: DK Morest, UConn Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030.

Postdoctoral Position is available immediately to study molecules involved in exit from the Golgi in the constitutive secretory pathway. The project uses multidisciplinary approaches, cell and molecular biology and biochemistry. Candidates should have experience on at least one of these disciplines and also have excellent communication skills. Please send resume, brief description of research experience and names of three references to: Dr. Kathryn Howell, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Cellular & Structural Biology, Box B111, 4200 E 9th Ave., Denver, CO 80262. University of Colorado Health Sciences Center is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

Postdoctoral Positions in Cancer. Positions are available at the postdoctoral level to study cell and molecular biology of ovarian cancer: angiogenesis, cytoskeletal signaling, invasion, lineage-specific differentiation, cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis and alterations in initiation and progression of ovary cancer. Applicants should have experience in signaling, molecular and cellular biology. Please send current curriculum vitae and three letters of reference to: Dr. Hava Avraham/Dr. Jerome E. Groopman, Division of Experimental Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Fax: (617) 975-6373; Email.

The Department of Anatomy at the University of Mississippi Medical Center has an opening for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor or higher. Teaching will be required and preference will be given to applicants with experience teaching Gross Anatomy. The applicant will be expected to engage in research or other scholarly activity. Significant opportunities also exist for collaboration with existing programs in motor systems neuroscience, cellular neurobiology, and cardiovascular cell biology, as described on the web site. Applicants should send a CV, a description of teaching qualifications and scholarly or research interests to Chair, Anatomy Department Search Committee, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 North State Street, Jackson, MS 39216-4505. Also, applicants should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to the address above. Review of applications will begin November 1, 1999. The University of Mississippi is an equal opportunity employer, M/F/D/V.

NIH-funded postdoctoral position available immediately to study the intracellular assembly and transport of the high affinity IgE receptor, a major component of the allergic pathway. These studies will explore the role of ER resident proteins in directing and promoting assembly and cell surface expression of the multichain IgE receptor complex (ag2 or abg2). Experience in molecular and cellular biology techniques is strongly preferred, particularly in cell transfection, FACS and immunoprecipitation analysis. Some experience in immunofluorescence and/or confocal microscopy is also desirable. Qualified candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents and have received a Ph.D. or M.D. degree. Interested individuals should respond by submitting C.V. and the names of three references to Michael W. Robertson, Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, MEM-131, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037.

 


Gifts
  09/01/1999

The ASCB is grateful to those below who have recently given gifts to support Society activities:

Daphne Blumberg
William H. Burgess
Andrew G. Campbell
J. David Castle
Victor M. DeLeon
Susan M. DiBartolomeis
Grace M. Donnelly
Daniel S. Friend
Joseph Gall
Ann L. Hubbard
David L. Kirk
William M. Leach
Wilfredo Mellado
Thoru Pederson
Joel L. Rosenbaum
Jean-Pierre Simon
Joachim R. Sommer
Bayard T. Storey
Susan S. Suarez
Ira Tabas
Katherine L. Wilson
Howard J. Worman
Kenneth M. Yamada

 


Grants & Opportunities
  09/01/1999

The PRAT Program is a competitive postdoctoral fellowship program to pursue research in one of the laboratories of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for individuals with backgrounds in the basic or clinical sciences who wish to obtain advanced experience in an area of pharmacology, or for those who are already pharmacologists to gain experience in new fields. Applicants must have received a Ph.D. or a professional degree in a basic or clinical science within the last five years, and they must be citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. Application deadline: January 2. For more information: Phone: (301) 594-3583; Fax: (301) 480-2802; Email; Website.

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program. 900 three-year NSF fellowships will provide a $15,000 stipend for 12-months, and a cost-of-education allowance of $10,500 per tenure year. Application deadline: November 4. For more information: (423) 241-4300; (423) 241-4513 (Fax); Email.

The URLs for the Office of Extramural Research (OER) Grants and Training Opportunities Web sites have changed:

The NIGMS Division of Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE) is offering several fellowships and awards for minorities:

 


Members In The News
  09/01/1999

Phyllis Hanson of Washington University, an ASCB member since 1997, received a new $1 million no-strings grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation.

Y. Peng Loh of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health, an ASCB member since 1988, has been named recipient of the 2000 FASEB Excellence in Science Award. Loh has chosen to receive the award at the 2000 ASCB Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Leonard Hayflick of the University of California, San Francisco, an ASCB member since 1960, was awarded the 1999 Anthony Van Wezel Award from the European Society for Animal Cell Technology.

W. Sue Shafer, Deputy Director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health, former Chair of the Women in Cell Biology Committee and an ASCB member since 1976, was appointed to Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Administration at the University of California, San Francisco.

 


ASCB Placement Service
  09/01/1999

The ASCB Placement Service continues to provide an informal, "user-friendly" setting at the Annual Meeting in which candidates and employers can meet, exchange credentials, and conduct interviews.

Candidates complete a brief Information Form to register with the Placement Service, and provide times they are available for interviews during the Annual Meeting. Placement Service registrants have access to notebooks of Employer Position Forms, a poster area containing position forms from newly registered employers, and a message center that allows them to send messages to employers and receive messages and individual interview appointments from employers.

Employers complete a brief Employer Position Form for each position they seek to fill. The Employer Reading Room provides access to copies of Candidate Information Forms in notebooks and hanging files (for their personal use) and clerks to schedule interviews. Message files are also available so that employers may receive candidate messages.

Candidate and employer ads will be developed from the registration form for each registrant and will appear in the Placement Service Brochures. A Pre-meeting Brochure, containing ads for candidates and employers who preregister with the ASCB Placement Service, and an On-site Brochure, will be produced at the close of Placement Service registration on Monday and available Tuesday. Brochures are available to Annual Meeting attendees at the Placement Service, the ASCB Booth in the Exhibit Hall, ASCB information tables, and the ASCB National Office headquarters at the Convention Center during the Annual Meeting.

Candidate and employer Placement Service Registration forms may be found on the ASCB website, or may be ordered from the ASCB. Please indicate number of copies required.

ASCB Placement Service Hours
Saturday, Dec.11, 12:00 noon - 6:00 pm
Sunday, Dec. 12 - Tuesday, Dec.r 14, 9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday, Dec. 15, 9:00 am - 3:30 pm

Registration
Saturday, Dec. 11, 12 noon - 6:00 pm
Sunday, Dec. 12 - Monday, Dec. 13, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Employer Interview Scheduling
Saturday, Dec. 11, 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Sunday, Dec. 12 - Tuesday, Dec. 14, 9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Interviews
Sunday, Dec. 12, 2:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Monday, Dec. 13 - Tuesday, Dec. 14, 9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday, Dec. 15, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

ASCB Placement Service fees remain unchanged:

Candidates Fees:
ASCB Student Member - no charge
Non-ASCB Member Student - $20
ASCB Postdoc Member - $25
ASCB Member - $25
ASCB Nonmember - $70

Employer Fees:
Academic or non-profit institutions - $150
Companies - $400

Preregistration deadline for the ASCB Placement Service is November 5.

 


ASCB-Promega Early Career Life Scientist Award
  09/01/1999

The ASCB and Promega Corporation have established a new annual award for early career life scientists to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the ASCB, to be called the ASCB-Promega Early Career Life Scientist Award. The first award will be presented at the 39th ASCB Annual Meeting this December.

Scientists who are assistant professors or at an equivalent career stage qualify for the Award. The Selection Committee, to be chaired by ASCB President Randy Schekman, will choose the first awardee, based on scientific merit, from nominations received by October 1.

"I wanted to establish this Award for the ASCB to recognize the great talent that has been attracted to the field of cell biology and, by example, to encourage students at the threshhold of a career in biomedical science. The opportunities for original discovery in cell biology remain as great as when this Society was created. This Award will demonstrate the range and impact of our discipline," remarked Schekman upon establishment of the Award.

The awardee will receive a monetary prize; Promega will in addition sponsor a major symposium in connection with the Award. Starting in 2000, the awardee will be invited to give a Symposium talk at the ASCB Annual Meeting.

Nominations for the 1999 Award must be received in the ASCB office by October 1 (see page 18 for Call for Nominations).

 


Annual Meeting Social Moves to American History
  09/01/1999

The traditional Social event organized by the ASCB Local Arrangements Committee and held during the Society's Annual Meeting will be moved to the National Museum of American History of the Smithsonian Institution.

The venue originally selected and announced was the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The change was necessitated by the Society's inability to negotiate satisfactory terms for loss liability with the museum.

The National Museum of American History, located on the Washington Mall, is one of D.C.'s largest, oldest and most diverse museums. Its exhibits range from the invention of the computer to the inaugural gowns of First Ladies to a reproduction of the Greenville Woolworth counter where the refusal to serve an African-American customer sparked the sit-in that was a major stimulus for the American civil rights movement. A new exhibit called "On Time" will be on display, exploring the changing ways Americans have measured, used and thought about time during the past 300 years.

Music and dinner will be provided. The ticket prices remain unchanged: $25 for student tickets purchased before October 1, $35 for non-student tickets before October 1, and $45 for all tickets purchased after October 1.

Requests from anyone who purchased a ticket for the original venue and wishes a refund will be honored if the request is received at the ASCB National Office by December 3.

 


Society to Participate in PubMed Central
  09/01/1999

The ASCB Council has endorsed the recommendation of the Molecular Biology of the Cell Editorial Board and has notified the NIH that the Society will provide the full editorial content of MBC for the initiative, two months following publication. See August ASCB Newsletter.

 


MBC Paper of the Year Award Recognizes UCLA Researcher
  09/01/1999

Han Htun of the University of California, Los Angeles, first author of the article on Direct Visualization of the Human Estrogen Receptor a Reveals a Role for Ligand in the Nuclear Distribution of the Receptor, published in the February 1999 issue of MBC, was named by the MBC Editorial Board as the eighth MBC Paper of the Year awardee.

Htun, an Assistant Professor of Ob-Gyn and Molecular & Medical Pharmacology, will speak at the ASCB Annual Meeting minisymposium Nuclear Structure and Nucleo-cytoplasmic Transport this December.

 


WWW.Cell Biology Education
  09/01/1999

The ASCB Education Committee calls attention each month to several Web sites of educational interest to the cell biology community. The Committee does not endorse nor guarantee the accuracy of the information at any of the listed sites. If you wish to comment on the selections or suggest future inclusions please send a message to Robert Blystome.

  1. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes
    The Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University and the Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo has established GenomeNet WWW server in both English and Japanese. This report focuses on KEGG: Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, a highly useful teaching and learning tool. The project leader at Kyoto University is Minoru Kanehisa. The Introduction section provides pdf documents about the project, a slide show dealing with "reconstruction of a biological organism," two tutorials, and on-line manuals on using pathway maps. The tutorials are well done and demonstrate how to navigate and understand the KEGG database. It takes some time to understand the well-thought out metaphor and the tutorials are extremely helpful in this regard. Opening the main KEGG contents page reveals a robust collection of pathway maps and molecular catalogs, genome maps and gene catalogues, and sequence similarity search tables. The information survey is extensive and contains references to representative bacteria, fungus, higher plants, nematode, insect, and mammals. The metabolic and regulatory pathways pictured are clear and well done. By clicking on key pathway points, various enzymes are displayed in greater detail and EC, PIR, SCOP 3D-folds, and PROSITE classification schemes are used. The molecular structure of various metabolites can be displayed. Differences in metabolic pathways between organisms are clearly marked. Java-based applets are extensively used. There is a search engine based on EC numbers, compound number, and gene name for pathway map searching. It is possible to download the entire database; however, it will take time to obtain the 54 Mbytes of information. It is suggested that the information could be loaded to CD and be made more portable. There is also a mirror package included. A limited, yet useful, set of links to molecular biology servers is also included. This is a quality site well worth your and your students' time. Thanks to ASCB member Malcolm Campbell for the pointer to this useful site.
  2. USDA for Kids
    The USDA maintains a major Web presence. Their various sites have been scoured to produce one place for all the information that would be useful and fun for a child. This metasite has pointers to 24 interesting places for children. The homepage opens with icons representing Smokey the Bear, Meet the Beagle Brigade, Agriculture for Kids, and RUS, the surfin' squirrel. One link to the Ohio State Extension service and "Twig the Walkingstick" takes on such questions as how do birds learn their songs?, do ducks feet get cold?, why do rabbits like carrots?, how do seedless grapes grow?, why do some cats go crazy over catnip? Some readers of this column may have wondered about these questions at some time. The Wiz Kid Activity Packet, which is part of the Science for Kids link, will definitely spark imagination. This page. would be heaven for a Web surfing middle school student. I must admit that I spent about two hours poking around this exceptional site for children. If you have school age children or if you do volunteer work in school science classes, check this site out.
  3. Marshmallow Bunnies
    Peep Research
    Fun with Science

    These sites are definitely tongue-in-cheek; but, they have some very useful pedagogical features. We often ask our students to design lab experiments. These sites provide a host of "experiments" performed on marshmallow bunnies and yellow peeps candies. The tests involve lasers, heat, flames, hottubs, electrocution and radiation, among other things. The solubility test on a Peep is a classic and demonstrates the scientific method at its "best"(?) The absurdity of the subjects and tests clearly demonstrate the ideas of experimental design. The sites are good for a laugh and then the idea of student-based experimentation will emerge from the fun. The last of the three sites is maintained by the Society of Physics Students at the University of Washington.

These sites were checked July 13, 1999. Previous ASCB columns reviewing Educational web sites with the links to the sites may be found at trinity.edu.

–Robert Blystone for the ASCB Education Committee

 


WWW.Cell Biology Education
  09/01/1999

The ASCB Education Committee calls attention each month to several Web sites of educational interest to the cell biology community. The Committee does not endorse nor guarantee the accuracy of the information at any of the listed sites. If you wish to comment on the selections or suggest future inclusions please send a message to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

  1. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes
    The Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University and the Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo has established GenomeNet WWW server in both English and Japanese. This report focuses on KEGG: Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, a highly useful teaching and learning tool. The project leader at Kyoto University is Minoru Kanehisa. The Introduction section provides pdf documents about the project, a slide show dealing with "reconstruction of a biological organism," two tutorials, and on-line manuals on using pathway maps. The tutorials are well done and demonstrate how to navigate and understand the KEGG database. It takes some time to understand the well-thought out metaphor and the tutorials are extremely helpful in this regard. Opening the main KEGG contents page reveals a robust collection of pathway maps and molecular catalogs, genome maps and gene catalogues, and sequence similarity search tables. The information survey is extensive and contains references to representative bacteria, fungus, higher plants, nematode, insect, and mammals. The metabolic and regulatory pathways pictured are clear and well done. By clicking on key pathway points, various enzymes are displayed in greater detail and EC, PIR, SCOP 3D-folds, and PROSITE classification schemes are used. The molecular structure of various metabolites can be displayed. Differences in metabolic pathways between organisms are clearly marked. Java-based applets are extensively used. There is a search engine based on EC numbers, compound number, and gene name for pathway map searching. It is possible to download the entire database; however, it will take time to obtain the 54 Mbytes of information. It is suggested that the information could be loaded to CD and be made more portable. There is also a mirror package included. A limited, yet useful, set of links to molecular biology servers is also included. This is a quality site well worth your and your students' time. Thanks to ASCB member Malcolm Campbell for the pointer to this useful site.
  2. USDA for Kids
    The USDA maintains a major Web presence. Their various sites have been scoured to produce one place for all the information that would be useful and fun for a child. This metasite has pointers to 24 interesting places for children. The homepage opens with icons representing Smokey the Bear, Meet the Beagle Brigade, Agriculture for Kids, and RUS, the surfin' squirrel. One link to the Ohio State Extension service and "Twig the Walkingstick" takes on such questions as how do birds learn their songs?, do ducks feet get cold?, why do rabbits like carrots?, how do seedless grapes grow?, why do some cats go crazy over catnip? Some readers of this column may have wondered about these questions at some time. The Wiz Kid Activity Packet, which is part of the Science for Kids link, will definitely spark imagination. This page. would be heaven for a Web surfing middle school student. I must admit that I spent about two hours poking around this exceptional site for children. If you have school age children or if you do volunteer work in school science classes, check this site out.
  3. Marshmallow Bunnies
    Peep Research
    Fun with Science

    These sites are definitely tongue-in-cheek; but, they have some very useful pedagogical features. We often ask our students to design lab experiments. These sites provide a host of "experiments" performed on marshmallow bunnies and yellow peeps candies. The tests involve lasers, heat, flames, hottubs, electrocution and radiation, among other things. The solubility test on a Peep is a classic and demonstrates the scientific method at its "best"(?) The absurdity of the subjects and tests clearly demonstrate the ideas of experimental design. The sites are good for a laugh and then the idea of student-based experimentation will emerge from the fun. The last of the three sites is maintained by the Society of Physics Students at the University of Washington.

These sites were checked July 13, 1999. Previous ASCB columns reviewing Educational web sites with the links to the sites may be found at trinity.edu.

–Robert Blystone for the ASCB Education Committee

 


Achieving XXcellence in Science
  09/01/1999

The ASCB is organizing a workshop with the National Institutes of Health Office on Research in Women's Health and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences on Building Women's Careers in Science. The workshop will take place immediately prior to the ASCB Annual Meeting this year, on December 9-10, in Washington D.C.

The forum will focus on scientific societies and their committees concerned with promoting women's careers. Participants will share strategies, successes and failures in promoting the careers of women in the sciences. The meeting will have a minimum of formal presentations; the majority of the sessions will be interactive. The expected outcome will be new ideas to be taken back to and implemented by the participating societies to promote the scientific careers of women. In addition, the assembled resources for women's careers, described below, will be posted on an appropriate web site.

Participating societies will include those whose members are Ph.D. level scientists who might reasonably apply to NIH for support. These include not only the traditional biomedical and behavioral areas but the non-traditional areas such as mathematics, physics, and engineering–where NIH is reaching out to include such disciplines in the research it supports. The career stages to be considered will range from undergraduates through full professor or equivalent, including how such senior individuals achieve national recognition. Careers in academia, industry, government and elsewhere will be considered.

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