Why do we still need an Association for Women in Science? An Interview with Isabel C. Escobar

The need for strong female leaders in STEM According to a 2011 U.S. Department of Commerce report, only one in seven engineers is f…

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Women in STEM: Still So Few and Far Between

The environment of women in STEM According to a 2014 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report, women make up 47 percent of the total U…

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Megan Cox—Postdoctoral Associate at Genzyme

1. Please describe your current position. I work in research & development at Genzyme studying rare diseases in skeletal biology. 2. How far in advance of your planned starting date did you begin looking for …

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Fresh Research, Delivered: How to Set up Preprint Alerts

How do you keep up to date on the literature in your field? If you rely exclusively on PubMed alerts, you might be missing out on the very freshest science: preprints, which are manuscripts that have yet to undergo journal peer review. Since PubMed is only for peer-reviewed literature, we have to fi…

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“People in this country have had enough of experts”: How Brexit Could Affect Scientists in the UK

Five years ago, I was in Lille, France, on a two-month sabbatical from my UK PhD program. The sabbatical was supported by a European Union (EU) grant to promote scientific interaction between member states. By all measures, it was a roaring success—far better than we had dared to hope. We had gone…

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A Call for Better Communication in Science

I think it’s pretty likely that many non-scientists watched, retweeted, posted, and emailed John Oliver’s rant about the media portrayal of scientific studies. The segment was spot-on and the punchline was pretty simple: We (the public) want definitive, inflammatory, exciting headlines, and the …

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Training to Teach: Preparing for the Other Half of Academia

Academic faculty jobs are difficult to come by, and science graduates are increasingly taking positions outside of ac…

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The REAL Perks of Graduate School

Lately graduate students and postdocs in the life sciences have been bombarded by articles, infographics, seminars, and blog posts describing the dire state of research funding and the uphill battle that young scientists face in the workforce. Articles like “The Postdoc, A Special Kind of Hell” …

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Conquering the Scientific Rut

Although scientists often embark on research questions full steam ahead, there are times along the way where they may encounter a classic “scientific rut,” especially after dealing…

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Research Ethics First, Accolades Later

Most of us became scientists because we are curious about the world around us,and want to delve deeply into how things work. My wish for the scientific enterprise is that scientists continue to report thei…

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