The ASCB Post staff brings you the latest news about science, advocacy, discovery, innovation, research and funding.


Cell News—Biology students get comfy with the quantitative future 

The old joke has gone flat—Biologists were the science kids in high school who couldn’t do math. But biology is increasingly quantitative and is likely to get more so. But how can undergraduates in introductory biology courses get more comfortable with quantitative reasoning? How can  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Liquid separation in cell subcompartments

Like vinegar and oil in salad dressing, the cell nucleus and other cell compartments contain liquid subcompartments that don’t mix. But unlike the vinegar and oil in salad dressing, these subcompartments manage to not fuse into giant pools, like the components of dressing will if  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Cells store extra membrane to keep up with supply and demand

Cells store extra membrane along pits and protrusions in the cell surface. But how cells regulate those membrane stores is not well understood. ASCB members Lauren Figard, Anna Marie Sokac, and colleagues at the Baylor College of Medicine monitored membrane supply and demand in Drosophila  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Endoplasmic reticulum protein involved in plasma membrane lipid regulation

Organelles once thought to be independent are coming to light as allies. Research in the last few years has built evidence that interactions between the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane play a role in lipid synthesis. However, the molecular mechanisms are still being investigated.  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Signaling OK to exit mitosis when spindle is aligned

In budding yeast if the mitotic spindle isn’t properly aligned, the cells won’t divide. But whether the cell signaling causes a halt in mitosis when the spindle is misoriented, or whether a properly oriented spindle causes mitosis to proceed was not known. Now Jill Falk  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Yeast lifestyles affect responses to stress

Even yeast get stressed. The environmental stress response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast used for wine-, beer-, and bread-making and model organisms in the lab, has been well studied. But whether its stress responses are unique to this species of yeast, or common in all  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Tango lessons for big guys from Barcelona

There has been a rather large hole in our understanding of how the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the cell’s protein and lipid assembly plant, manages to export very large molecules. A whole array of important but bulky proteins are simply too big to be exported inside  … Read more

Share this:


Erika Shugart Named ASCB Executive Director

The ASCB Council has named Erika Shugart, PhD, as its new Executive Director, effective June 1. In making the announcement, ASCB President Peter Walter hailed Shugart’s background in bench biology, her skills in science communication, and her leadership in marketing and strategic planning as a  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Mapping translation in live cells

Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) code gene protein products and are highly mobile within the cell.   While researchers have been able to track mRNA movement, it wasn’t possible to see which of these mRNAs were actively translating to proteins. Now Zachary Katz and colleagues in ASCB member  … Read more

Share this:


Cell News—Septins can spot the big stuff in cell shape

Cells are shape shifters, rearranging themselves for diverse functions from cell division to sprouting a flagellum. But how does a cell know what shape it’s in? We’ve known that proteins can sense cellular contours on the nano scale, that is, 1 x 10-9 m, but  … Read more

Share this: