The ASCB Post staff brings you the latest news about science, advocacy, discovery, innovation, research and funding.


Cell News—Septins can spot the big stuff in cell shape

Cells are shape shifters, rearranging themselves for diverse functions from cell division to sprouting a flagellum. But how does a cell know what shape it’s in? We’ve known that proteins can sense cellular contours on the nano scale, that is, 1 x 10-9 m, but  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—How a rare class of antibodies neutralizes the HIV-1 virus

The Holy Grail in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine is the “broadly neutralizing antibody” or bNAb. The target for all immune antibodies attacking HIV-1 is the virus’s glycoprotein envelope (Env), which is a complicated twist of two proteins, gp120 and gp41. The resulting Env  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Seeing the leaves for the forest

Did you have a high school biology teacher who was keen on taxonomy and keying out tree species? If you discovered that the real forest and the keyed forest in your handbook didn’t always match, you might enjoy an ingenious new paper in PNAS from  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Decoding noncoding RNA from virus to host

Next-generation sequencing is uncovering a vast array of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that may form a whole new class of RNAs that affect transcription. The Yale laboratory of Joan Steitz, who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, a longtime ASCB member, and a founder  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Structure of immune protein remnant that protects against pathogens

A vertebrate’s first line of defense against pathogens are antibodies. An antibody receptor, pIgR (polymeric immunoglobulin receptor) is conserved across vertebrates from fish to humans, and a piece of the receptor comes off and becomes part of the antibody package to help stabilize the antibody.  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—A septin dials down microtubule cargo delivery in neurons

You’ve probably seen animations of microtubule transport (MT) where a kinesin motor protein strolls along a microtubule, towing a massive cargo vesicle tethered above like a Macy’s Thanksgiving parade balloon. The N-terminal motor head domain with its shuffling “feet” has been finely dissected by researchers,  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Lysosome pH varies based on organelle’s position in the cell

The cell’s recycling station, the lysosome, is coming to light as a cause for concern in a host of diseases, including Alzheimer’s and a group of 50 rare genetic diseases known as lysosomal storage diseases. For lysosomes to work properly they must maintain an acidic  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Signaling in response to stiff breast tumor matrix

As breast tumors progress, the matrix surrounding the tumor cells becomes stiffer. How normal cells sense and respond to the changes in stiffness was not well understood. Now Lily Thao-Nhi Le and colleagues in ASCB member Lindsay Hinck’s lab at University of California, Santa Cruz  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Cardiomyocyte junction protein loss promotes fibrotic gene expression

Desmosomes in cardiomyocytes physically hold the cells together, and allow for electrical signaling to propagate through the heart. These structures are also host to signaling proteins (TGF-β1/p38 MAPK) that have been found to be dysregulated in cardiac diseases, such as arrhythmogenic or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ASCB  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Cell News—Pile-up of intermediate filaments drives giant axon neuropathy

It has an ungainly name and an uglier phenotype. Giant Axon Neuropathy (GAN) is an extremely rare genetic disease that manifests itself in children under five as a distinctive waddling walk. On the cellular level, the signature of GAN is a pile-up of aggregates and  … Read more

Share this:

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone