The ASCB Post staff brings you the latest news about science, advocacy, discovery, innovation, research and funding.


Cell News—A new class of unfolded protein response inhibitors

When unfolded or misfolded proteins accumulate in the cell’s endoplasmic reticulum (ER) an unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered to mitigate the potential damage. The UPR has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and inhibiting the process could ameliorate Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Alzheimer’s disease,  … Read more

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Cell News—Lipids have specialized sorting processes too

Proteins and lipids are made in the Golgi apparatus and then are packaged and delivered to specific locations in the cell. Different proteins are known to be sorted into specific packages, but whether lipids are also sorted, or delivered in bulk, was not known. Now  … Read more

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Cell News—Making cell biology education more interdisciplinary

Research now rarely happens in silos, and cell biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary with physics, math, and larger-scale biology. However, cell biology at the undergraduate level is often taught without interdisciplinary elements. Carolyn Weber, Assistant Professor at Idaho State University, has ideas and preliminary evidence  … Read more

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Cell News—Of COPII vesicles and sour pickles

COPII, the coat protein complex II, is the cargo master of the cell. Stationed close to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), COPII grabs and sorts newly minted proteins as they emerge from the ER, wrapping them into what are called COPII vesicles. These are shipped to  … Read more

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Cell News—Cap and shoulder above in muscle plasma membrane repair

Now you’ve done it. Run too far, lifted too much, or played tennis too long. You’re worried that you may have injured skeletal muscle but even while you’re rounding up ice packs, your muscle cells are already frantically trying to cope. Ruptures in the plasma  … Read more

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Cell News—Scaling up DNA editing

Easily editing a cell’s native DNA to make specific proteins glow is a cell biologist’s dream. The glowing GFP-tagged proteins can be followed and monitored as they go about their business. But with over 20,000 proteins encoded in the human genome, it’s a daunting task  … Read more

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Cell News—First evidence of prions in flowering plants

Their very existence was once controversial but prions now move in the best scientific circles, having been documented in animals including human and in yeast as a non-genetic but heritable mechanism for cell regulation. But what about prions in plants? So far no one has  … Read more

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Cell News—Biology students get comfy with the quantitative future 

The old joke has gone flat—Biologists were the science kids in high school who couldn’t do math. But biology is increasingly quantitative and is likely to get more so. But how can undergraduates in introductory biology courses get more comfortable with quantitative reasoning? How can  … Read more

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Cell News—Liquid separation in cell subcompartments

Like vinegar and oil in salad dressing, the cell nucleus and other cell compartments contain liquid subcompartments that don’t mix. But unlike the vinegar and oil in salad dressing, these subcompartments manage to not fuse into giant pools, like the components of dressing will if  … Read more

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Cell News—Cells store extra membrane to keep up with supply and demand

Cells store extra membrane along pits and protrusions in the cell surface. But how cells regulate those membrane stores is not well understood. ASCB members Lauren Figard, Anna Marie Sokac, and colleagues at the Baylor College of Medicine monitored membrane supply and demand in Drosophila  … Read more

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