The ASCB Post staff brings you the latest news about science, advocacy, discovery, innovation, research and funding.


McKinley and Sheltzer to Receive 2016 Bernfield and Gilula Awards

  Kara McKinley, now a postdoc in Ron Vale’s lab at the University of California, San Francisco, will receive the 2016 Merton Bernfield Memorial Award. The Bernfield Award honors a postdoctoral fellow or graduate student who has excelled at research. McKinley was selected for her graduate  … Read more

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Cell News—Nervous Wreck coordinates remodeling, at least in neurons

One of the joys of fly genetics is the tradition of whimsical naming by generations of imaginative Drosophila researchers who have come up with such gems as Tinman, which affects the fly heart, and the world famous Hedgehog family, which affects development in everything eukaryotic.  … Read more

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Cell News—How the formidable formins close the gap on wounds

The formins are a bustling family of cellular proteins involved in all sorts of basic biology from development to tissue maintenance to wound healing. The formins are well connected because they can regulate actin polymerization at the fast growing, barbed end of the filament. In  … Read more

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A Missing Influence in Keeping Diversity Within the Academy?

A new study of science PhDs who embarked on careers between 2004 and 2014 showed that while nearly two-thirds chose employment outside academic science, their reasons for doing so had little to do with the advice they received from faculty advisors, other scientific mentors, family,  … Read more

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Cell News—Taking better aim with CRISPR

CRISPR/Cas9 has rapidly become the wonder tool of cell biology, giving researchers the ability to slice and dice genomes with effortless precision. Except that is not always the case. To gauge what affects the accuracy and effectiveness of CRISPR/Cas9, ASCB member Thoru Pederson and colleagues  … Read more

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Cell News—Super-resolution microscopy technique sees nuclear proteins flip

A number of rare diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, are linked to the disruption of nuclear envelope transmembrane (NET) proteins. However, it has been difficult to determine the location and translocation rates of NETs in the outer and inner nuclear membranes.  … Read more

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Cell News—Cytoskeleton regulator affects nucleus shape in migrating and invading cells

Metastasis is a worst-case scenario for someone with cancer, and certain cellular processes make cancer cells more likely to metastasize. In migrating cells the protein fascin regulates F-actin, a structural component that helps cells keep their shape and move. Fascin expression is correlated with increased metastatic  … Read more

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Young, Gifted, and First-Generation Minority Science Students Motivated by ‘Prosocial’ Values

There are as many motives as there are undergraduates taking introductory science courses, but if you look closely at groups of freshman science students such as those from underrepresented minority (URM) backgrounds, you can see striking motivational differences across and within these groups. That’s a  … Read more

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Persistence Makes the Difference in Minority Participation in Science Careers, Wisconsin Researchers Say

The problem of persistence has long troubled undergraduate programs hoping to guide promising students from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups into science careers, but a new study by science education researchers at the University of Wisconsin says that the problem appears to be translating students’ initial interest  … Read more

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Cell News—Molecular teamwork makes dynein stronger

The Olympics isn’t the only place where teams are competing to be the strongest. In cells a molecular tug-of-war pulls cargo along microtubule tracks, and kinesin is thought to be the strongest motor protein, producing 6 pN of force. The motor protein dynein acts in  … Read more

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