Amanda Haage is a postdoctoral fellow in Guy Tanentzapf’s Lab at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Here she investigates how cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix regulates animal development. She previously received her PhD in 2014 from Iowa State University in Ian Schneider’s Lab where she studied how extracellular mechanics regulates cancer cell motility. Twitter: @mandy_ridd and Email: mandy.ridd@gmail.com


Spotlight: COMPASS Outreach Grant Recipients Spring/Summer 2018

Science is an endeavor that impacts everyone. The ultimate goal of science is the advancement of humankind, through exploration, medical technology, or conservation of our surroundings. Despite this overarching goal, much of the public remains uninvolved in the deep and confusing world of scientific research.  … Read more

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preLights: Preprint highlights for biology

Preprints are a growing trend that is pushing the pace of dissemination of scientific information. preLights is a new service that selects and highlights preprints in a wide range of biological fields and can help you keep up to date! First, what are preprints? Preprints are unpublished  … Read more

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What’s it all about? Microfluidics

This installment of “What’s it all about?” will attempt to demystify the exciting miniature world of microfluidic technology, particularly as it pertains to cell biology and chip-sized cell culture systems. What are microfluidics? The term microfluidics can be used for both the physics-based study of  … Read more

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Six ways to start something new in the lab

You walk into the lab right on time (before 9:00 am of course!), pull out your precisely written protocol from your perfectly organized binder, and get to work. After executing each step flawlessly in a space specifically dedicated to this protocol, you get a nice  … Read more

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Lego Grad Student: Stepping one brick up in academia

Academia can be filled with intense passion, fruitful discovery, and rewarding self-fulfillment. That’s the dream, right, the reason we are all here? Those moments are great and should be celebrated. But for most, these moments are far too infrequent to sustain us through the long  … Read more

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What’s it all about? Super Resolution Microscopy

This installment of “What’s It All About?” aims to tackle the exciting field of super resolution microscopy. For centuries scientists have been limited technically by the diffraction limit of traditional light microscopy. Structures a few hundred nanometers apart cannot be resolved with conventional methods. As  … Read more

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Spotlight on 2017 Fall COMPASS outreach grant recipients

Science outreach can be many things—teaching and inspiring a younger generation of scientists, communicating results in an accessible way to the public, or engaging in public advocacy for things like increased government science funding or the adoption of evidence-based government policies. These activities are becoming  … Read more

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What’s it all about? Organoids

The second installment of the “What’s it all about series?” aims to tackle the broad utilization of in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culture models, termed organoids. There are numerous definitions for what constitutes an organoid, and just as many applications for their use. Though sometimes hard  … Read more

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What’s it all about? CRISPR/Cas

Science changes over time. The collective knowledge of a field builds upon itself as new techniques allow us to ask new questions and find new answers. Sometimes as trainees we become ultra-focused on our current experiments and projects, missing these shifts in standards. Have you noticed  … Read more

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Spotlight: COMPASS Outreach Grant recipients

The ASCB Committee for Postdocs and Students (COMPASS) is a group of trainees dedicated to promoting the voice and visibility of early career scientists, including through science outreach. Such outreach not only allows us to showcase to the public how government funds are spent toward scientific  … Read more

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