A whimsically named fly gene, Sunday Driver, a.k.a. syd, and its mammalian analog, JIP3, seem to be in the driver's seat when it comes to parking the multiple nuclei of a skeletal muscle cell in their correct places, say researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI). Getting that wrong and having mispositioned nuclei is a classic diagnostic sign of human congenital myopathies, a string of inherited muscle diseases such as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD).

Published in Live from ASCB 2013

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and the most deadly adult primary brain tumor, with an average survival of just 14 months following diagnosis. Even with aggressive treatment by surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, most therapeutic approaches targeting the glioma cells in GBM fail. Faced with this bleak picture, Johanna Joyce and colleagues at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City looked for an alternative strategy and turned to non-tumor cells that are part of the glioma microenvironment, the cancer's cellular neighbors. In particular, they zeroed in on tumor-associated macrophages and microglia (TAMs). The results were startling.

Published in Live from ASCB 2013

As we have learned more about the biology of cancer, it has become obvious that, aside from changes to the cancer genome, there are many other factors that determine tumor outcomes. Epigenetics, influences from the microenvironment, exosomes, and interplay with the immune system are now all recognized major players in cancer progression. Fresh evidence from Alain Silk, Melissa Wong, and colleagues at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland implicates a century-old observation—fusion of cancer cells with macrophages—as a new potentiator of cancer progression.

Published in Live from ASCB 2013

E-cigarettes have put nicotine back in the news and into the hands of a growing number of American smokers who now "vape," that is, inhale a steam of nicotine, polyethylene glucose (PEG), and flavoring generated by cigarette-shaped, battery-powered vaporizers.

Published in Live from ASCB 2013

Cell division is the great domestic drama of a cell's life. In sickness and in health, cell division by mitosis is the complicated yet critical process by which a mother cell divides into two daughter cells. But first the mother cell has to pack up her cellular household contents, disassembling and dividing up everything for her soon-to-be-formed daughters. How cells manage division has been exhaustively studied for well over a century and yet basic mysteries remain.

Published in Live from ASCB 2013

Dramatic stories in cell biology often have sequels—"Duel of the Alzheimer's Proteins, Part XV"—and indeed this work is a nail-biting sequel to George Bloom's hypothesis that interaction between amyloid-beta peptides and the protein tau drives adult neurons into the forbidden pathway of "cell cycle re-entry" (CCR). The long-term result is Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bloom and colleagues at the University of Virginia (UVA) now say that they have found the critical balance point between tau and a master cellular regulator that amyloid-beta oligomers disrupt.

Published in Live from ASCB 2013

Fever, ache, and the other miseries of influenza viral infection afflict 5−20 percent of the U.S. population each year. The "flu" is usually not life-threatening to the majority of its victims, but as the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 showed, flu viruses can evolve into lethal agents and spread worldwide. The ability of flu viruses to change continually through mutation and genetic swaps is the reason that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reformulates the flu vaccine each year, hoping to block the types and subtypes of influenza viruses that they believe are most likely to be in circulation.

Published in Live from ASCB 2013
Tuesday, 26 November 2013 00:00

What is Significant? Reevaluating the P-Value

You finished all your replicates, your data are entered into your favorite statistical software, and you've got your fingers crossed that the test reveals a P-value of less than 0.05. It reads 0.039 and you breathe a sigh of relief. Without that P-value, you would have been stuck with your null hypothesis—that terrible possibility that your observed effect was meaningless. Instead, with the P-value on your side, you're finally ready to publish a significant observation. That is, unless you show it to Valen Johnson, a statistics professor at Texas A&M University, who has just published an analysis in PNAS1 that indicates your data are not so convincing.

Published in ASCB Post

Remember that second-grade science project when you watched bean plants grow toward a light source? Little did you know, you were researching heliotropism. Tropism in plants is turning toward or away from a stimulus such as sunlight, gravity, or water. And now there's a new tropism to investigate, although not for second graders.

Published in ASCB Post

Like a kid hovering over an ant with a magnifying glass, you can easily fry a worm with a microscope. But if you could do it without zapping the subjects, long exposure imaging would be immensely helpful for studying a cell process like development in a living Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. In a pair of just published papers—one in Nature Biotechnology yesterday and another in Nature Methods on October 6—Hari Shroff, tenure-track investigator at the NIH, unveiled a pair of new microscopes that offer an alternative solution to the problem of light-blasted subjects.

Published in ASCB Post
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