John Fleischman

John Fleischman

John is ASCB Senior Science Writer and the author among other things of two nonfiction books for older children, "Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story About Brain Science" and "Black & White Airmen," both from Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt, Boston.

Wednesday, 13 February 2013 19:00

John Charles Hutton

John Charles Hutton, Professor of Pediatrics and Cellular & Developmental Biology and Research Director of the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, died December 18 in Denver. He was 64.

In July 2013, Dan Kiehart, chair of the Biology Department at Duke University, will become the dean of the Natural Sciences Division within Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke's undergraduate liberal arts school. Kiehart, a Society member since 1980, currently serves on the ASCB Council.

The first elected chair of the Women In Cell Biology (WICB) committee, Ellen R. Dirksen, professor emeritus in Neurobiology at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, died on January 5.

Lucy Shapiro, Stanford University, was at the White House February 1 to receive a 2011 National Medal of Science from President Barack Obama who described the medals as "the nation's highest honor for invention and discovery."

Jeffrey I. Gordon, of the Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology at Washington University in St. Louis, an ASCB member since 1988, is the recipient of the National Academy of Sciences Selman A. Waksman Award in Microbiology.

Sue Biggins of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and current ASCB Council member will receive the National Academy of Sciences 2013 Award in Molecular Biology, which comes with a $25,000 prize, courtesy of Pfizer Inc. It recognizes a recent notable discovery by a young scientist.

The year 1953 is generally considered the year zero for molecular cell biology with the publication of Watson and Crick's celebrated Nature paper on the structure of DNA. But there was another big paper in 1953 by Yves Clermont and Charles Leblond of McGill University that appeared in the American Journal of Anatomy.

ASCB Urges All Researchers to Sign the DORA Pledge

An ad hoc coalition of unlikely insurgents—scientists, journal editors and publishers, scholarly societies, and research funders across many scientific disciplines—today posted an international declaration calling on the world scientific community to eliminate the role of the journal impact factor (JIF) in evaluating research for funding, hiring, promotion, or institutional effectiveness.

A standing-room-only crowd at a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee May 15 heard the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) top brass bemoan the stagnation in the last decade of federal funding for biomedical research and plead to be spared further cuts in the fiscal year 2014 (FY14) budget.

The "journal impact factor" rebellion is spreading. In the two weeks since it first went online, DORA—the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment  hat calls on scientists and scientific organizations around the world to minimize use of the journal impact factor (JIF) in evaluating research and  researchers—has seen the number of individual signers jump from 155 to 6,083 while the number of scientific organizations signing on has gone from 78 to 231.

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