Friday, 26 July 2013 00:00

Keeping Scientists Connected and Engaged

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 HW35468COMPASS is composed of four subcommittees. The social subcommittee is focused on promoting interactions among scientists at the annual meeting and throughout the year. Our team strives to keep members connected, involved, and interactive. We are dedicated to improving communication, fostering professional and social relationships, and expanding the ASCB network. Indeed, one of the best aspects of ASCB is networking. The social subcommittee has lots of projects in the works and a few creative ideas in the pipeline to boost your networking potential.

The Arab world. Let's face it, when you hear that term, most of you don't really think about science. In the best case scenario you think about the "Arab Spring" that has gripped that part of the world recently... but that's the best case scenario, let's be honest.

Thursday, 11 July 2013 15:46

Searching for a search engine

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One of the things I love most about being a scientist is constantly learning. Normally that means regularly searching for new papers published in my field of research, either by entering the term/gene/topic in PubMed or by scanning the tables of contents of a handful of journals I follow. However, every once in a while an experiment spits out an unexpected result that changes the course of the whole project, linking my research to something I know nothing about.

Tuesday, 02 July 2013 20:00

Please comment on why you don't comment

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Scientific work progresses through the communication of ideas and almost every scientist I have ever met tends to talk ad nauseum about their research or science in general. Yet as much as scientists like to talk about their work and to publish their work, very few comment on articles. Indeed, every COMPASS Blog post has been read well over 100 times, yet there have been 0 comments. I published one research article that has been read over 22,000 times but has received only eight comments, two of which were our own (1).

I wonder why scientists do not comment on articles? So, rather boldly I ask you to comment below on why you may not typically comment on science articles.

1. Nicholson JM and Ioannidis JP (2012) Research grants: Conform and be funded. Nature 492, 34-36

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