"Deciding to 'leave the bench' and basic research after committing many, many years to graduate school is not an easy thing to do," Katrina Yu begins her essay in the special November 1 issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC). "There is real pressure from peers, principal investigators (PIs), even parents, to stick it out and follow a more established career path, either to academia or the biotech industry."

Tuesday, 29 October 2013 10:56

Scientists Play at Boston Science Hack Day

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On a brisk and sunny New England fall Saturday, hackers filed along the Cambridge sidewalks, skirting the venerable Harvard Museum of Natural History to descend the starkly modern concrete stairs of the university's five-year-old Northwest Science Building. Down the steps they went, under the suspended whale skeletons and into a basement with natural light pouring in from the windows mounted in the lawn above. There on modular red sofas and often on the floor, the hardiest spent the next 30 hours immersed in Science Hack Day Boston, an experiment in combining science, skill, and playfulness that was sponsored in part by ASCB.

Recently the organizers of Celldance may have gone too far when they threatened to reveal the fates of all the characters on a certain retro TV dramatic serial involving Madison Avenue. The show is wreathed in cigarette smoke so we weren't feeling bad about choking it off.

Two days after the government's 16-day closure came to an end, the NIH announced that it would delay the final approval of grant applications submitted in fall 2013 until spring 2014. Two days after that, the NIH changed its mind again, announcing that it would "now reschedule most of the 200+ missed peer review meetings so that most applications are able to be considered at January 2014 Council meetings."

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