SymposiaMinisymposiaMicrosymposia

If a speaker’s name is linked below (in blue), there is an iBiology presentation you can view.

Symposium 1: Mechanical Forces in Cell Biology

Sunday, December 4, 8:00 am

Rapid cell migration through dense tissues – it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle. Matthieu Piel, Institut Curie, Paris, France

Under pressure: epithelial cell population control. Jody Rosenblatt, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah

Forcing Form and Function. Valerie Weaver, University of California, San Francisco

Supported by Physical Biology

Symposium 2: Organelle Organization

Sunday, December 4, 9:45 am

The behavior of mitochondria. Jodi Nunnari, University of California, Davis

The Cell Biology of Lipid Storage. Tobias Walther, Harvard/HHMI

Symposium 3: Disease Informing Cell Biology

Monday, December 5, 8:00 am

Cell biological and genetic basis of neurodevelopmental disease. Joseph G. Gleeson, University of California, San Diego, and Rockefeller University/HHMI

Mitochondrial parts, pathways, and pathogenesis. Vamsi Mootha, Massachusetts General Hospital/HHMI

Symposium 4: Quality Control

Monday, December 5, 9:15 am

Selective inhibition of a phosphatase to correct protein quality control failures and treat neurodegenerative diseases. Anne Bertolotti, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK

Stressed Out: A Novel Approach to Cancer Immunotherapy. Laurie H. Glimcher, Weill Cornell Medical College

Mechanisms of nascent protein quality control in the cytosol. Ramanujan Hegde, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK

Symposium 5: Cellular Communities*

Tuesday, December 6, 8:00 am

Quorum Sensing and its Control. Bonnie Bassler, Princeton University/HHMI

Modeling human brain development and disease in stem cell derived 3D organoid culture. Jürgen Knoblich, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA), Vienna, Austria

Primary functions for “secondary” metabolites in microbial communities. Dianne K. Newman, California Institute of Technology/HHMI

Symposium 6: Logic of Signaling

Tuesday, December 6, 9:45 am
Supported by The Anatomical Record and The American Association of Anatomists

Anastasis, recovery from the brink of apoptotic cell death, in normal development and disease. Denise Montell, University of California, Santa Barbara

Dissecting regulatory circuits: from cells to tissues. Aviv Regev, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard/HHMI

Symposium 7: Nuclear Organization

Wednesday, December 7, 11:20 am

The role of heterochromatin in a complex organism: stabilizing the genome. Susan M. Gasser, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research and University of Basel, Switzerland

Following Single mRNAs from Birth to Death in Living Cells. Robert H. Singer, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Janelia Research Campus/HHMI

Emerging Topic Symposium: Mitochondria and Cancer Cell Biology

Monday, December 5, 7:20 pm
Jointly supported by the National Cancer Institute, NIH and the ASCB

Organizers:
Michael Graham Espey, National Cancer Institute, NIH
Jodi Nunnari, University of California, Davis
Speakers:
Role of mitochondria in cancer cell adaptive responses and metastasis. Dario C. Altieri, The Wistar Institute Cancer Center, Philadelphia
Metabolic consequences of Ras-induced mitochondrial fission in pancreatic cancer. David Kashatus, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
New frontiers in ER-mitochondrial dynamics. Jodi Nunnari, University of California, Davis
Role of SOD1 and the inter-membrane space in the mitochondrial UPR. Doris Germain, Mount Sinai Hospital, Icahn Medical Institute, NY

* Heinz Herrmann was Professor Emeritus of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Connecticut. A symposium in his honor was endowed at the ASCB in 1990. A founder of the ASCB, Professor Herrmann was well known for his pioneering approach to research in developmental biology, which has led to over 100 publications. He also wrote two books—Cell Biology andFrom Biology to Sociopolitics.

Minisymposia Topics and Co-Chairs

All minisymposia sessions run concurrently on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday afternoon from 4:15 pm to 6:50 pm, and on Wednesday morning from 8:30 am to 11:05 am. Click on the titles below to view the full schedule for each minisymposia.

Sunday, December 4, 4:15 pm-6:50 pm

Minisymposium 1: Bacterial Mechanics, Development, Division, and Polymers
Room 310
Co-Chairs: Zemer Gitai, Princeton University; and Lucy Shapiro, Stanford University School of Medicine

Minisymposium 2: Cell Cycle Regulation and Decisions
Room 103
Co-Chairs: Hilary Coller, University of California, Los Angeles; and Arshad Desai, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research

Minisymposium 3: Intermediate Filaments from Cytoplasm to Nucleus
Room 309
Co-Chairs: Sandrine Etienne-Manneville, CNRS, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France; and Jan Lammerding, Cornell University

Minisymposium 4: Membrane Traffic Control By Lipids, Cargos, and Motors
Room 104
Co-Chairs: Vlad Denic, Harvard University; and Lois Weisman, University of Michigan

Minisymposium 5: Microtubule Dynamics
Room 305
Co-Chairs: Gaia Pigino, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany; and Antonina Roll-Mecak, The National Institutes of Health

Minisymposium 6: Technological and Biological Frontiers in Signaling and Differentiation
Room 306
Co-Chairs: Jeremy F. Reiter, University of California, San Francisco; and Jared Toettcher, Princeton University

Education Minisymposium: Evidence-Based Education
Room 120
Co-Chairs: Amy Prunuske, Medical College of Wisconsin; and Shannon Seidel, Pacific Lutheran University

Monday, December 5, 4:15 pm-6:50 pm

Minisymposium 7: Actin Dynamics
Room 305
Co-Chairs: Magdalena Bezanilla, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; and Tatjana Piotrowski, Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Minisymposium 8: Cell Biology of the Nucleus
Room 306
Co-Chairs: Abby Dernburg, University of California, Berkeley/HHMI; and Bing Ren, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research/UCSD

Minisymposium 9: Chromosome Segregation Mechanisms
Room 103
Co-Chairs: Sue Biggins, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/HHMI; and Scott Keeney, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center/HHMI

Minisymposium 10: Connecting Cells to Tissues
Room 104
Co-Chairs: Xin Chen, Johns Hopkins University; and Zev Gartner, University of California, San Francisco

Minisymposium 11: Organelle Contact Sites and Biogenesis
Room 302
Co-Chairs: Laura Lackner, Northwestern University ; and Gia Voeltz, University of Colorado, Boulder

Minisymposium 12: Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation
Room 301
Co-Chairs: Jeff Coller, Case Western Reserve University; and Mitch Guttman, California Institute of Technology

Tuesday, December 6, 4:15 pm-6:50 pm

Minisymposium 13: Cell Death and Genome Instability
Room 103
Co-Chairs: Ingrid Wertz, Genentech, Inc.; and Junying Yuan, Harvard Medical School

Minisymposium 14: Cell Mechanics
Room 305

Supported by BMC Biology

Co-Chairs: Edwin Munro, University of Chicago; and Julie Theriot, Stanford University Medical Center

Minisymposium 15: Cell Polarity and Morphogenesis
Room 104
Co-Chairs: Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and Jennifer Zallen, Sloan-Kettering Institute/HHMI

Minisymposium 16: Dark Matters in Signaling and Differentiation
Room 301
Co-Chairs: Takanari Inoue, Johns Hopkins University; and Yingzi Yang, Harvard School of Dental Medicine

Minisymposium 17: Genome Replication and Gene Regulation
Room 310
Co-Chairs: David Pellman, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Stirling Churchman, Harvard Medical School

Minisymposium 18: Quality Control and Organelle Trafficking
Room 302
Co-Chairs: Julie Brill, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada; and, Jared Rutter, University of Utah/HHMI

Minisymposium 19: Recent Developments in Autophagy and ESCRT Biology
Room 306
Co-Chairs: Adam Frost, University of California, San Francisco; and Wade Harper, Harvard Medical School

Wednesday, December 7, 8:30 am-11:05 am

Minisymposium 20: Cell Division- Chromosome and Cytoskeletal Dynamics
Room 104
Co-Chairs: Karen Oegema, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research/UCSD; and Marius Wernig, Stanford University

Minisymposium 21: Cell Migration and Invasion
Room 305
Co-Chairs: Jan Lammerding, Cornell University; and Tatjana Piotrowski, Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Minisymposium 22: Cell-Fate Determination in Signaling and Differentiation
Room 310
Co-Chairs: Kun-Liang Guan, University of California, San Diego; and George Eisenhoffer, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Minisymposium 23: Membrane Traffic Control By Cytoskeletal and Molecular Machines
Room 306
Co-Chairs: Tina Lee, Carnegie Mellon University; and Max Nachury, Stanford University

Minisymposium 24: Membrane-less Organelles
Room 302
Co-Chairs: Yves Barral, ETH Zürich, Switzerland; and Geraldine Seydoux, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine/HHMI

Minisymposium 25: Organ Development, Homeostasis, and Disease
Room 301
Co-Chairs: David Bilder, University of California, Berkeley; and Andrew Ewald, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Minisymposium 26: Use Synthetic Biology to Measure and Manipulate Cell Biology
Room 309
Co-Chairs: John Dueber, University of California, San Francisco; and Ron Weiss, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Microsymposia Topics and Moderators

Two microsymposia sessions run concurrently on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday from 11:00 am-12:06 pm, 12:25 pm-1:31 pm, and 1:50 pm-2:56 pm.

Click on the titles below to view the full schedule for each microsymposia.

Sunday, December 4, 11:00 am-12:06 pm

Microsymposium 1: Autophagy/ESCRT
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 2: Genome Replication, Gene Regulation, and Gene Editing
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Sunday, December 4, 12:25 pm-1:31 pm

Microsymposium 3: Cellular Interactions and Disease
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 4: Organelles
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Sunday, December 4, 1:50 pm-2:56 pm

Microsymposium 5: Chromatin and Intranuclear Organization
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 6: Cytoskeletal Molecular Dynamics
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Monday, December 5, 11:00 am-12:06 pm

Microsymposium 7: Cell Adhesion and Migration
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 8: Regulation of the Trafficking Machinery
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Monday, December 5, 12:25 pm-1:31 pm

Microsymposium 9: New Insights Into the Cell Division Mechanisms
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 10: Spatial Organization of the Cell
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Monday, December 5, 1:50 pm-2:56 pm

Microsymposium 11: Development, Regeneration and Wound Healing
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 12: Membrane Trafficking and Signaling
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Tuesday, December 6, 11:00 am-12:06 pm

Microsymposium 13: Nuclear Structure, Function, and Movement
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 14: Trafficking Dynamics and Imaging
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Tuesday, December 6, 12:25 pm-1:31 pm

Microsymposium 15: Cell Shape and Signaling
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 16: Development and Invasion
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Tuesday, December 6, 1:50 pm-2:56 pm

Microsymposium 17: Cell Division in Development and Disease
Microsymposia Room 1, Learning Center, Hall C

Microsymposium 18: Signaling and Bioengineering
Microsymposia Room 2, Learning Center, Hall C

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